Dead to Sin, Alive in Christ: Romans 6:1-14

What shall we say, then? Shall we go on sinning so that grace may increase?”  (Rom. 6:1)

In other words: If God is so forgiving, why change? Why not continue in sin if His grace is indeed greater than the deepest stain of sin? (Rom. 5:20)

Never one to hold back his beliefs, Paul retorts to this distorted line of reasoning: “By no means!” He continues describing the Christian’s death to sin by using the picture of baptism.

Baptism

“In the church of Paul’s day, immersion was the usual form of baptism—that is, new Christians were completely “buried” in water. They understood this type of baptism to symbolize the death and burial of the old way of life. Coming up out of the water symbolized resurrection to new life with Christ” (NIV Study Bible).

Baptism is a witness to the world that one identifies with Jesus Christ’s death, burial, and resurrection.

"Since, then, you have been raised with Christ, set your hearts on things above, where Christ is seated at the right hand of God. Set your mind on things above, not on earthly things. For you died, and your life is now hidden with Christ in God. When Christ, who is your life, appears, then you also will appear with Him in glory."  - Colossians 3:1-4

“Since, then, you have been raised with Christ, set your hearts on things above, where Christ is seated at the right hand of God. Set your mind on things above, not on earthly things. For you died, and your life is now hidden with Christ in God. When Christ, who is your life, appears, then you also will appear with Him in glory.”  Colossians 3:1-4

So What?

God’s amazing grace covers all our sins, but His forgiveness doesn’t make sin less serious. Although His mercy and pardon are free, it cost Jesus His very life to pay our ransom from sin. God never intended His unlimited reservoir of grace to be wasted, or become an excuse for immorality.

As long as we are here on earth we will feel the pull of sin and temptation, but through the indwelling Holy Spirit, God frees us from sins’ captivity. If we think of our old, sinful life as dead and buried, we have a strong motive to resist sin and enjoy this new life with Christ. This is the believer’s daily choice and responsibility. (For more on this concept see: Galatians 3:27, Colossians 2:12 and 3:1-4.)

The Gift of Righteousness, Romans 5:12-21

One man sinned—a whole race suffers for it; one Man lived righteously—a whole race wins life by it. But what about Law? . . . . Law only came in by the way, to intensify the consciousness of guilt.” – John Owen

Summary of Romans 1-5

So far Paul has given us five benefits of justification through faith (God declaring us not guilty for our sins):

  1. A new relationship with God characterized by peace
  2. Access to God through Christ
  3. Hope of sharing “the glory of God”
  4. A new understanding in suffering
  5. A new assurance in judgment

In this section, Paul adds a sixth benefit of justification: the gift of righteousness. He gives us a lengthy contrast between Adam (the first man) and the results of sin and Jesus Christ (the “second man”) and His generous provisions of atonement through life and death.

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Death Through Adam, Life Through Christ (vs. 15-19)

While Adam is a pattern that represents created humanity, Christ represents a new spiritual humanity. Shepherd’s Notes identifies five parallels between Adam and Christ. The first three are contrasts, and the last two are comparisons:

  1. A contrast between Adam’s trespass, through which many died, and the free gift of God’s grace in Christ, which has abounded for many (vs. 15).
  2. A contrast between the condemnation that followed Adam’s trespass and the justification that follows the free gift of God’s grace (vs. 16).
  3. A contrast between the death that reigned through Adam’s trespass and the much greater reign in the lives of those who receive the free gift of God’s grace (vs 17).
  4. A comparison between the condemnation that came to all people through Adam’s trespass and the acquittal that comes to all people through Christ’s act of righteousness (vs. 18).
  5. A comparison between the disobedience of Adam, through which the many were made sinners, and the obedience of Christ, through which the many will be made righteous (vs. 19).
So What?

Although we are all born into Adam’s family line of sin, resulting in separation from God, judgment, and death—God’s grace trumps sins’ rule of death through God’s justifying work in Christ: “Where sin increased, grace increased all the more, so that grace might reign through righteousness to bring eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord” (vs. 20-21).

Because of Jesus, we can trade judgment for forgiveness. He invites us to choose life by being born into His spiritual family, which begins with forgiveness and leads to eternal life. By faith in Christ and His work on the cross, we can become His children and reign over sins’ power.

Which family do you belong to?

Assurance in Judgment, Romans 5:6-11

I received my gold crown today. Yes, really . . . I did! However, I almost bailed halfway through the process.

I nearly jumped out of the chair when my dentist began prepping my exposed tooth. The unnerving sensation—akin to finger nails on a chalkboard—caused me to impulsively grab my dentist’s hand. That’s when he asked, “Shall I numb the area?”

“Yes, please!”

I’ll be okay now, I thought when my tongue felt fat and tingly after the shot. Yea, I won’t feel a thing now! But one poke of his instrument stole my breath with those unnerving shock waves. So I opted for another numbing shot. While waiting for the novocaine to set in, my thoughts shifted like the wind: This shot isn’t going to do the job either! And when it doesn’t, how am I going to hold still? Should I just up and leave? No, I can’t do that! Do they ever strap their patients hands down? Dear Lord, please help me not feel this, or at least distract me from this pain . . . . And so my thoughts flickered.

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Uncertainty

Everyone struggles with uncertainty at times: decisions, jobs, relationships, etc.

Do you ever feel uncertain of God’s love for you? If so, spend some time soaking in these amazing words:

But God demonstrates His own love for us in this: While we were still sinners. Christ died for us. Since we have now been justified [declared not guilty for our sins] by His blood, how much more shall we be saved from God’s wrath through Him! For if, when we were God’s enemies, we were reconciled to Him through the death of his Son, how much more, having been reconciled, shall we be saved through His life!”  – Romans 5:8-10

At the perfect time, God orchestrated the unthinkable: sending His sinless Son to die for the atonement of our sins. We don’t—and can’t—get our act together before coming to Christ. 2 Corinthians 5:21 says, “God made Him who had no sin to be sin for us, so that in Him we might become the righteousness of God.” Our sin was poured into Christ at His crucifixion. His righteousness is poured into us when we place our trust in Christ at our conversion.

So What?

God’s love is bigger than our doubts and sin. Because His generous act has provided reconciliation, Christians “rejoice in God through our Lord Jesus Christ” (vs.11). We can rest and have complete confidence, knowing we will be saved from God’s wrath at the final judgment because Jesus paid our sins in full.

The same love that caused Christ to die is also the same love that equips believers with the indwelling Holy Spirit to guide, teach, and comfort (John 14:26).

If you haven’t asked Jesus for forgiveness and placed your trust in Him, there is no time like now. Don’t let anything hold you back from coming to Christ.

The Believer and Suffering, Romans 5:3-5

When I’m biking I occasionally see deer grazing on the surrounding hills. I love watching them bound uphill, gracefully jumping over brush. If only I could painlessly leap over problems like that, I think to myself. But that rarely—if never—happens, unless God removes the obstacle(s). It’s not that God doesn’t grant strength, He does when asked. But rough terrain is par for the course during our earthly journey.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIn fact, the Bible doesn’t promise believers that problems and trials will dissolve once we place our trust in Christ. Rather, God challenges us to embrace suffering as a source of joy (James 1:2-4; 1 Peter 1:6-7). Why? The results from Christian suffering bring spiritual maturity. This is another benefit of justification (God’s act of declaring us “not guilty” for our sins), along with a new relationship with God, access to God, and peace with God.

A New Understanding in Suffering

In this passage Paul—who was no stranger to suffering—outlines a linked-chain process of Christian suffering:

  1. “Suffering produces perseverance” (vs. 3): Suffering translated is pressure, distress from outward circumstances.
  2. “Perseverance produces character” (vs. 4): Character translated describes the quality of being approved. “Endurance brings proof that we have stood the test” (vs. 4, NEB).
  3. “Character produces hope” (vs. 4): Paul tells us that this hope “does not disappoint us, because God’s love has been poured out into our hearts by the Holy Spirit, whom He has given us” (vs. 5).
So What?

My NIV Study Bible says it well: “In the future we will become, but until then we must overcome. This means we will experience difficulties that will help us grow. We rejoice in suffering not because we like pain or deny its tragedy, but because we know God is using life’s difficulties and Satan’s attacks to grow our character.”

Benefits of Justification, Romans 5:1-2

“Therefore, since we have been justified through faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have gained access by faith into this grace in which we now stand.” – Romans 5:1-2

Although these two verses are short, they are loaded with significance.

Paul’s opening “therefore” not only connects what he has written in the previous verses, but also summarizes his stance in chapters 1-4.

Peace

The following images come to mind when I think of “peace”. 41ea72419cad64621eb3c86e1169b96b

 

 

 

 

But the “peace” Paul refers to is a new relationship with God where hostility of sin is absent because it has been removed. It is both objective and external.

What are the benefits of justification?

Along with acquiring a new relationship with God when justified by faith (vs. 1-2), we are also blessed with the following:

  • Access to God. Ephesians 2:17-18 says, “He came and preached peace to you who were far away and peace to those who were near. For through Him [Jesus] we both have access to the Father by one Spirit.” The curtain that sealed one’s view—and denied access except yearly by the high priest—was torn when Jesus died on the cross. This symbolized that all believers may come into God’s presence any time (Mark 15:38; Hebrews 10:19).
  • Hope of sharing the glory of God. We can look forward to our future because God promises to share His glory. In fact, His obedient children are currently reflecting His glory. “This grace in which we stand,” is the utmost privilege. Besides declaring us not guilty, God has also drawn us close to Himself. When we were enemies with Him, He made a way for us to not only be His friends, but also His children (John 15:15; Galatians 4:5).
So What?

Those who have placed their faith in Jesus Christ can confidently relax in the assurance that Christ paid the death penalty for their sins and are declared not guilty through His resurrection.

Do you have peace with God?

says, “For He [Jesus] himself is our peace . . .”  - Ephesians 2:14

“For He [Jesus] himself is our peace . . .” – Ephesians 2:14

The following link will take you to a short informational video about the Old Testament temple and the veil that separated God from people: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LDNHoijNO2I

 

The Promise of Many Descendants, Romans 4:13-25

“As for me, this is my covenant with you: You will be the father of many nations. No longer will you be called Abram; your name will be Abraham, for I have made you a father of many nations. I will make you very fruitful; I will make nations of you, and kings will come from you. I will establish my covenant between me and you for the generations to come, to be your God and the God of your descendants after you.” – Genesis 17:4-7

Abraham’s name means “father of a multitude”. Israel, the nation that would come from Abraham, was to follow God and influence others. Jesus Christ—born to save humanity— descended from Abraham’s family line. 6fbc418779f48e2f1433a58ed83d578bThrough Christ, people can have a personal relationship with God and become His children by being grafted into His family.

As the first Hebrew patriarch, Abraham became a role model of faith. God’s promises to Abraham and his descendants are based on grace, not on their ability to keep the Law. Although Abraham made mistakes and sinned, he believed in God’s power and integrity. His goodness and faith became evident in his actions of surrender, obedience, and complete confidence in God to carry out His promises.

Shepherd’s Notes observes: “Putting the relationship between God and humans on a legalistic basis invites the wrath of God. Relationships with a legalistic basis require both parties to carry out perfectly both the spirit and the letter of the Law. Failure to do this results in penalties (wrath) to the offending party. Knowing the weakness of human nature as He does, God knows right relationship must be founded on something other than a legal basis.”

Paul ends this section reminding us that Abraham’s justification by faith has purpose for us too: for “us who believe in Him who raised Jesus our Lord from the dead” (vs. 24) is also reckoned righteousness . . . . Jesus “was delivered over to death for our sins and raised to life for our justification (vs. 25).

So What?

God graciously gave His Son, Jesus Christ,8607e1deaa4c56349abdb964bdfba256 to be crucified and raised to life as payment for our sins. All who reach out in faith will receive the power of His forgiveness, eternal life, and abundant blessings.

On what basis did God declare Abraham righteous?

What does it mean to be justified by faith?

Abraham Justified by Faith, Romans 4:1-8

This chapter builds on the previous one: “man is justified by faith apart from observing the Law”. Justification is God’s act of declaring us “not guilty” for our sins.

In this section, Paul offers proof that faith—not works—was God’s plan in the Old Testament. Abraham, the founder of the Jewish nation, was the first Old Testament model of justification by faith. When Abraham was 75, God revealed that He would bless and multiply Abraham’s offspring through a son. Even though Abraham was childless and didn’t know how God would bring about His plan, he placed his confidence in God. Paul cites Genesis 15:6, “Abraham believed God, and it was credited to him as righteousness.”

In verse 4 Paul reasons that if a person could earn right standing with God by being good then the giving of that gift would be an obligation instead of a free act. Paul also reminds us of King David’s joyous discovery of forgiveness of sins in Romans 4:7-8.

www.pinterest.comSo What?

Like Abraham, we can also have a right relationship with God by trusting Him. God desires dependence, faith, and trust—not faith in our ability—to please Him. Jesus Christ is stronger than our feelings and/or actions. He is  able to completely save those who reach out to accept His generous gift of salvation, even when our faith is small. Justification marks the entry point of our relationship with God in salvation when we place our faith/trust in His Son, Jesus Christ.

How do we get rid of guilt from our sin? The NIV Study Bible suggests: 1) quit denying our guilt and recognize our sin, 2) admit our guilt to God and ask for His forgiveness, and 3) let go of our guilt and believe that God has forgiven us.

In view of Jesus’ sacrifice on the cross, is any sin too big for Him to cover?

Righteousness Through Christ, Romans 3:21-31

If you feel buried with the depressing news of God’s condemnation of our sin, hold on! 8eac46465563cf7c764bde3ab6662c60

Paul brings us great news: We can be declared not guilty—justified—by trusting Jesus Christ to remove our sins.

Paul’s meeting with the risen Christ on the Damascus road radically changed his dependence on the Law and his stance that he was righteous by following the Law (Phil. 3:6). In this passage, he writes of the righteousness found through Jesus Christ.

Attested by the Law and the Prophets

In verse 21 Paul expands on Rom. 1:2 to include the Law with the prophets in bearing witness to God’s saving acts in Jesus Christ. Interestingly, the Old Testament promises are fulfilled in the New Testament.

Experienced through Faith in Jesus Christ (vs. 22-25)

Paul reminds us of our verdict: “for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God” (vs. 23).

But he doesn’t leave us stranded in God’s just death penalty toward us due to our sins. Instead, Paul affirms that God made available a right relationship with Him by trusting His Son, Jesus Christ.

Sweet Grace

Grace: The free favor of God in salvation. Unmerited, unearned “kindness and love of God our Savior toward us” (Titus 3:4).

I thought my cousin’s picture depicts a great response to God’s grace.

Photo credit: Kendall Smitherman

Photo credit: Kendall Smitherman

Paul’s uses three metaphors to illustrate what God has done for sinners through His Son, Jesus Christ (vs. 24-25):

  1. Courtroom: In this setting, we see a condemned person who hears his/her charges have been completely cleared.
  2. Slaves: In Old Testament times, a person’s debts could result in his being sold as a slave. The next of kin could buy his freedom (redemption) and set him free from bondage. Jesus paid the price of our sin, death, so we can go free.
  3. Ritual Sacrifice: The wrath of God has been removed from the guilty person.
God’s Justice

In verses 25-26, Paul shows that God forgave all human sin at the cross, even those who lived before Christ came. Paul argued that God’s timing doesn’t mean He is indifferent to sin and justice, but rather: 1) He is just, and 2) He is the One who justifies—makes right with Himself—those who trust in Him.

The following points sum up this section:

  • Excludes Pride (vs. 27-28): When God’s grace is understood, pride vanishes. Why? Faith isn’t a deed we perform, rather, it exalts what God has done. Faith is based on our relationship with God, not on trying to attain right standing with God by keeping the Law.
  • Affirms God As God of All (vs. 29-30): Paul affirms that God is the God of both Jews and Gentiles.
  • Upholds the Law (vs. 30): Does faith “nullify” (abolish) the Law? As in the opening of chapter 3, Paul answers “Absolutely not!” Faith in Christ fulfills all the obligations of the Law. The NIV study Bible says, “When we understand the way of salvation through faith, we understand the Jewish religion better . . . . Faith does not wipe out the Old Testament. Rather, it makes God’s dealings with the Jewish people understandable.”
So What?  

When God confronts us with the gospel of Christ, we are invited to receive a righteousness and right standing before Him apart from following any legalistic religious code. What God has done through the death of His Son on the cross—providing payment for our death penalty—may be experienced by us through faith.

Why does God desire a relationship with us based on faith in His Son?

What are some results of justification by faith (God’s act of declaring us not guilty for our sins)?

All Are Guilty Before God, Romans 3:9-20

“Get it? Got it? Good!” If the apostle Paul were alive today he might use this blunt lingo with his emphatic questions to the Jewish congregation. For sure, he wasn’t afraid to use repetition as a tool to drill into his reader’s comprehension. This theme wasn’t easy to understand and accept by God’s chosen Jews.

Paul’s “Courtroom Scene”

This passage models a courtroom scene. Shepherd’s Notes identifies the nuts and bolts in the following caption.

The Accusation    (vs. 9)         "Jews and Gentiles alike are under sin." The Evidence     (vs. 10-18)    "There is no one righteous, not even one; . . . There is no fear of God before their eyes." The Setting           (vs. 19)       "Every mouth may be silenced and the whole world held accountable to God." The Verdict           (vs. 20)       "Therefore no one will be declared righteous in His sight by observing the Law; rather, through                                                     the Law we became conscious of sin."

The Accusation (vs. 9): “Jews and Gentiles alike are under sin.”
The Evidence (vs. 10-18): “There is no one righteous, not even one; . . . There is no fear of God before their eyes.”
The Setting (vs. 19): “Every mouth may be silenced and the whole world held accountable to God.”
The Verdict (vs. 20): “Therefore no one will be declared righteous in His sight by observing the Law; rather, through
the Law we became conscious of sin.”

Paul hammers his point: The Jews who were under the Law were neither better off nor disadvantaged. Both Jew and Gentile stand equally guilty before God.

Paul weaves several Old Testament passages together in verses 10-17 to create a seamless support for verse 18, his weightiest rebuke: “There is no fear of God before their eyes.”

So What?

Knowledge abounds in our information age, but wisdom is rare. Proverbs 1:7 (NLT) says, “Fear of the LORD is the foundation of true knowledge, but fools despise wisdom and discipline.” To fear the Lord is to revere, respect, and honor Him. This plumb line of acknowledging and trusting God should gauge our attitudes, principles, and actions.

In respect to God’s Law, its purpose is to guide our conduct. God never intended for the Law to save us through our best efforts and/or goodness. It’s easy to get caught up in a performance mode. I know, I’ve been there. How about you? Are you trying to earn or gain God’s acceptance?

God’s Faithfulness, Romans 3:1-8

There’s no camouflage here. The apostle Paul paints a bleak portrait of our sin against the canvas of God’s brilliant holiness. In the previous two chapters, Paul chisels away at the common excuses people use to justify they’re not sinners: 1) “There is no God” (1:18-32), 2) “I’m better than others” (2:1-16), 3) “I’m religious, or a church member” (2:17-29).

Okay, there is some camouflaging in this "Deadly Sins" t-shirt.  Can you find seven sins hidden in the skull? (supermarkethq.com)

Okay, there is some camouflaging in this “Deadly Sins” t-shirt. Can you find seven sins hidden in the skull? (supermarkethq.com)

Paul Defends With Four Questions

This chapter begins with Paul strengthening his defensive stance: All stand guilty before God.

It’s as though he’s tackling an imaginary opponent who is blitzing him with objections on his previous points of Jewish “lostness”. In classic Paul style, he fires back with four questions:

  1. What advantage has the Jew? (vs. 1-12) Paul’s statement about real circumcision and true Jewish identity undoubtedly sent shock waves throughout the congregation (2:25-29). They would naturally have questions. Paul answers this question: “Much in every way!” The Jews were chosen first to model and share God’s words in the Old Testament. (Paul later lists other advantages in Rom. 9:1-5.)
  2. Does Jewish unfaithfulness nullify God’s faithfulness? (vs. 3-4) Paul answers: “Not at all! Let God be true, and every man a liar.” (“Not at all!” has been translated as “Far from it!”) In chapter 2, Paul described the hardened Jews who talked the Law talk, but failed to walk the Law walk (2:21-24). They were faithless to the covenant God made with them. Paul cites part of Psalm 51:4 to prove God’s vindication in judgment.
  3. Is not God unjust to impose His wrath upon us? The imaginary objector proposed that his sin provided a contrast to God’s righteousness, thus highlighting God’s holiness. Paul answers: “Certainly not!” Shepherd’s Notes says it well: “If that were so, how could God judge the world? The moral governorship of the universe was at stake with such an absurd charge.”
  4. Does not my falsehood cause God’s truth to abound? This question is similar to #3. This reasoning feeds the lie: “Let us do evil so good may shine forth.” (vs. 8) What is Paul’s response to this twisted concept? “Their condemnation is deserved.”
So What?

God doesn’t need our sin to highlight His holiness. Instead, He wants us to reflect His love and goodness.

The Mosaic Law, which God gave to show us how to live, convicts us of our sin. The Law, however, is not our source of hope—God is.

We can’t earn God’s love; He freely offers us forgiveness and eternal life through faith in His son, Jesus Christ—not through observance of the Law.

Authentic Jewishness is Inward, Romans 2:17-29

I hope you’re enjoying summer. Mine has been a flurry of baseball games, swim lessons, kid chauffeuring/refereeing, and gardening. Although my weeds are persistent, they don’t argue. :)

Speaking of arguments, Paul continues his to the Jews in this passage: Everyone, including Jews, stands guilty before God.

Jewish Advantages and Pride

In verses 17-20 Paul parallels the Jews’ pride with their advantages:

  • You call yourself a Jew (vs. 17). The Jews were proud of their heritage. 2 Kings 16:6 records the first mention of the term Jew.
  • You rely on the Law (vs. 17).
  • You glory in (brag about) your relationship to God (vs. 17).
  • You know His will (vs. 18). The full revelation of God’s will was given to the Jews through the Law before Jesus entered earth’s scene.
  • You approve what is superior (vs. 18). Because of the Law they knew right and wrong.
  • You are convinced you are a guide for the blind, a light for those in darkness (vs. 19-20). This reveals the Jews’ high esteem for themselves and low regard for the Gentiles.
The Jews’ Inconsistencies

In verses 21-24, Paul strikes out the Jews’ hypocrisy when he expands on his previous charge in Rom. 2:3:

"So when you, a mere man, pass judgment on them [Gentiles] and yet do the same things, do you think you will escape God’s judgment?” –Rom. 2:3

“So when you, a mere man, pass judgment on them [Gentiles] and yet do the same things, do you think you will escape God’s judgment?” –Rom. 2:3

Paul’s curve ball comes in the form of five high-thrown questions, dropping over home plate with a pronouncement to each.

  1. You who teach others, do you not teach yourself (vs 21)?
  2. You preach against stealing, do you steal (vs. 21)? This refers to the eighth commandment.
  3. You say not to commit adultery, do you commit adultery (vs.22)? This refers to the seventh commandment
  4. You who abhor idols, do you rob temples (vs. 22)? This also refers to those who act irreverently in or against a holy place.
  5. You who brag about the Law, do you dishonor God by breaking the Law (vs. 23)? Hollow praise—bragging about the Law without obeying it—insults God.
Obedience to the Requirement of Circumcision (vs. 25-29)

As a sign of the covenant between God and Abraham, God commanded Abraham to circumcise every male. Although this was practiced by other males in ancient times, it held special meaning for the Jews. However, Paul countered that a real Jew was one inwardly, not by the external tradition. Deuteronomy 30:6 speaks of the kind of circumcision that counts—circumcision of the heart—operated by the Holy Spirit. Instead of mechanically observing the written code, it involves cutting away the old sinful nature.

Questions to Chew On
  • Why does Paul show the Jews’ inconsistencies?
  • What do God’s judgments tell us about Him?
  • What does circumcision of the heart accomplish that observing the Law cannot?
  • How does any of this relate to us today, especially if we are not Jewish?

God’s Righteous Judgment, Romans 2:1-16

High-fives echo in response to the judge’s verdict on the Gentiles: “Guilty as charged.”

166163e41e3c9ac70768869d063e6d8bLike the last passage, I feel like I’m in a courtroom, but this time slinking down in my seat to avoid apostle-attorney Paul’s piercing gaze as his focus shifts from the Gentiles toward the Jews. No, I’m not Jewish, but Paul didn’t let anyone slide. Probably some Jewish heads nodded their approval when Paul pronounced God’s judgment on the pagan Gentiles. Paul lights into their condemning attitude like a firecracker (verses 1-10).

You, therefore, have no excuse, you who pass judgment on someone else, for at whatever point you judge the other, you are condemning yourself, because you who pass judgment do the same things.” –vs. 1

Despite knowing God’s laws, the Jews failed to live up to it. Their sin may have been hidden in more socially acceptable forms. But Paul faults them for having a stubborn and unrepentant heart, treating God’s great kindness, tolerance, and patience with contempt.

Those who patiently and persistently do God’s will, however, will find eternal life (vs. 7). This may sound like a contradiction to his statement that salvation comes by faith alone (1:16-17), but he is stressing that our deeds follow in grateful response for what God has done.

Again, Paul warns of God’s wrath toward: self-seekers, those who reject the truth, and those who follow evil.

Judgment With or Without the Law

All who sin apart from the Law will also perish apart from the Law, and all who sin under the Law will be judged by the Law.” – vs. 12

Paul weaves his case: Can the religiously privileged Jews expect special treatment because they’ve been given the Mosaic Law? This gave the Jews greater responsibility for following it.

Or could the Gentiles receive an easier verdict for not having God’s Law? Certainly God’s revelation through the Law made His will more fully known. But God made Himself known to the Gentiles through nature and the inner law of conscience.

Conclusion

Paul concludes that all—Jew and Gentile—are guilty of violating God’s Laws. People are condemned for what they do with what they know, not for what they don’t know. God doesn’t play favorites. God patiently waits for our repentance. But a time is appointed when He will judge everyone’s secrets when we stand before His throne. No one will stand apart from the saving grace found in His son, Jesus Christ. (For more on God’s judgment, see John 12:48 and Revelation 20:11-15.)

So what?

The sins we’re tempted to point out in others are often the sins we struggle with the most. Like King David, we need to consistently ask God to search our hearts and show us our sin so we can seek His forgiveness.

Ps. 51Those of us who have grown up in Christian families could be considered today’s religiously privileged. Are we focused on living according to what we know? Or are we passing judgment on those around us?

God’s Revelation, Romans 1:18-32

“Guilty as charged!” The judge’s gavel slams down with thundering finality.

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Like a seasoned attorney in a court room, Paul threads God’s general revelation through nature as a convincing argument for the revelation of God’s wrath in His judgment on the Gentiles who rebel against Him. In the following verses, Paul tackles a common objection: How could a loving God send anyone to hell?

The wrath of God is being revealed from heaven against all the godlessness and wickedness of men who suppress the truth by their wickedness, since what may be known about God is plain to them, because God has made it plain to them. Since the creation of the world God’s invisible qualities—His eternal power and divine nature—have been clearly seen, being understood from what has been made, so that men are without excuse.” – vs. 18-20(NIV)

God’s revelation of Himself through nature gives the simplest grounds of our responsibility toward Him. Through His creation, (although marred by sins’ effects, Gen. 3:17-19), we know God is powerful, intelligent, creative, and a God of order and beauty.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERADoes anyone have an excuse for not acknowledging God?

Although no one will be excused for not believing in God, some will choose not to acknowledge Him or give Him thanks.

Sins’ Downward Cycle

Paul comments about God’s wrath in verse 18 from Romans 1:19-3:20. The downward cycle of sin can be summarized as the following:

  • Rejection of God—arrogance and rebellion; self is placed on the throne
  • Idolatry—One makes up ideas of what a god should be and do; exchanging the truth for a lie to fit one’s lifestyle
  • Fall into sin—sexual sin, greed, hatred, envy, murder, strife, deceit, malice, gossip are a few mentioned here
  • Hatred toward God—encouraging others to join them
God’s Nature

Although God is patient and long-suffering—desiring to restore the sinner— He will not put up with sin forever. His very nature is holiness.

The Verdict?

God’s judgment of sin and impurity begins by allowing the consequences of people’s sinful choices. Verse 21 speaks of those who refuse to glorify and thank God: “their thinking became futile and their foolish hearts darkened”. Verse 24 speaks of God giving them over to their sinful desires, indicating sexual impurity. Finally, Paul lists 21 indictments (negative qualities) against those who abandon themselves to their sinful natures (vs. 29-32).

Following God and choosing faith in Him may be hard, but is choosing not to follow Him easier?

Resisting God may seem easy at first, but this path eventually leads to the worst kind of slavery: slavery to sin.

Gospel Power, Romans 1:16-17

Over lattes, a friend and I found ourselves chatting about our beliefs. Her jaw dropped when I told her I believe the Bible is God’s authoritative truth and revelation to us. She could hardly believe I didn’t rely on any other religious writings/teachings. But at the time, I struggled to give her a reasonable explanation why I thought this. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI’ve since found the following verses in Romans helpful. These two verses clearly state why the gospel is so important while stating a fundamental tenet of the Christian faith:

I am not ashamed of the gospel, because it is the power of God for the salvation of everyone who believes: first for the Jew, then for the Gentile. For in the gospel a righteousness from God is revealed, a righteousness that is by faith from first to last, just as it is written: ‘The righteous will live by faith.’” – Vs. 16-17

What is the Gospel Power?

God’s effective power, through His Holy Spirit, initiates and leads one to salvation. His inspired words contained in the Bible give us enough information to know Him—His character, purposes, love, and expectations—and also teach us how to have a personal relationship with Him. When we read and heed God’s words, God grows our faith, which is a gift from Him. He also transforms us into His likeness.

Shepherd’s Notes suggest that the salvation Paul describes is more than forgiveness of sins. It includes the big picture of being delivered from the results of our sin:

  1. Justification – Being set right with God; deliverance from the penalty of sin
  2. Sanctification – Growth in holiness; deliverance from the power of sin
  3. Glorification – Ultimate transformation into the likeness of Christ; deliverance from the presence of sin
Three Power Points of the Gospel

Paul wasn’t ashamed of the gospel’s Good News because he experienced God’s saving grace and life changing power in a BIG way. He also knew God’s salvation was available to everyone.

Shepherd’s Notes also observes the following gospel points in Romans 1:

  1. It’s the fulfillment of God’s promises (v. 2)
  2. It centers in the person of Jesus Christ (v. 3-4)
  3. It is the “power of God for the salvation of everyone who believes” (v. 16)
So What?

When we discipline ourselves to study the Bible and pray, God will lovingly meet us right where we are. God will help us through trials and grow us in Him. He longs to bless us with life both now and forever.

How is your Bible reading going?

Related Posts: The B-I-B-L-E, Why Study the Bible?, Bible Study-The Holy Spirit’s Role

Paul’s Desire to Visit Rome, Romans 1:8-15

My family’s first boating trip this season gave us opportunity to try out our worn, but workable, canopy. Although it kept us from getting soaked by the onslaught of rain, it also blocked the mountainous scenery, which challenged our joy quota. But an hour later, when we docked for lunch, the grey clouds gave way to blue sky and sunshine. We felt rejuvenated! My kids, along with my husband, whooped and hollered while playing “King of the Dock” before tubing behind the boat.

- K.D. Manes

– K.D. Manes

Although the apostle Paul experienced dire circumstances with water (deadly storms and shipwrecks), Romans 1:8 suggests one source of his refreshment as he opens this section with thanksgiving and prayer for the reader.

I thank my God through Jesus Christ for all of you, because your faith is being reported all over the world.”

What a great thing to be known for. These faith filled believers shined brightly amidst Rome’s darkened society. Although this Roman capital was artistic, literary, and wealthy, it also bore the stains of immorality and idolatry.

Why did Paul thank God through Jesus Christ?

The emphasis in verse 8 is on Christ being the only mediator between God and man (1Timothy 2:5).

  • Love and forgiveness flow from God to us through Christ.
  • Our thanks flow to the Father through Christ.
Paul’s Prayer and Desire to Visit Rome

The bulk of Paul’s prayer is in verses 10-15. He wanted to visit the Roman church to: 1) “impart a spiritual gift”—to mutually encourage and strengthen each other through their faith, and 2) help in the gospel harvest among the Gentiles as he had done elsewhere.

Paul obligated himself to teaching and proclaiming Christ his Savior as salvation to all.

Although Paul had prayed to visit Rome, his attempts were waylaid. When he finally did arrive, it was as a prisoner—slapped, shipwrecked, and bitten by a poisonous snake (Acts 28:16). God did, however, answer his request for a safe arrival.

Has God ever surprised you with His timing and/or answers to prayer?

He may answer our prayers in unexpected ways, but the One who reigns in power and wisdom is in control of our storms.

God is With  Us

Paul’s Salutation, Romans 1:1-7

While our “Dear John” letters usually include minimal details about ourselves, the ancient letter writers wrote differently. The writer placed his name first, the identity of the reader next, then a greeting.

Romans begins with the author, Paul, following this format. He identifies himself in three ways:

1) A “servant of Jesus Christ”

  • Although Paul was a Roman citizen, he no longer embraced the average Roman’s attitude that being a servant was uncool. Instead, Paul threw his energy into dependence and obedience to his new found Master. Paul’s former zeal for his ancestral tradition had garnered him honor and high ranking in Judaism. As a religious Pharisee, Paul’s fierce intensity targeted killing Christians because he thought they endangered Judaism (Acts 9:1-25). But after his conversion from Jesus’ confrontation, Paul declared himself Christ’s bondslave (Gal. 1:1-14).

2) “Called to be an apostle”

  • God chose Paul’s role. Paul responded by preaching Christ throughout the Roman Empire on three missionary journeys.

3) “Set apart”

  • God set Paul (formerly Saul) apart to serve Him by sharing and spreading the gospel.
Paul’s Purpose for Writing (vv. 2-6)

Paul declares his purpose for writing to verify his apostolic message. God had promised His gospel earlier “through the prophets in the holy Scriptures.” Some of these prophecies about Jesus Christ and the Good News are Genesis 12:3; Psalm 16:10; 40:6-10; 118:22; Isaiah 11:1; Zechariah 9:9-11; 12:10; Malachi 4:1-6.

In verses 3-4, Paul presents Jesus Christ as the center of the gospel. Jesus, descendant of King David, fulfilled Old Testament Scriptures predicting the Messiah coming from David’s line. Several New Testament passages also verify the Davidic descent of Jesus: Matthew 1:1; Luke 1:31-33; Acts 2:29-30; Revelation 5:5.

In relation to Jesus’ present exaltation, Paul cites “Jesus Christ our Lord” as “the Son of God by His resurrection from the dead”.

Grace & Peace

“Grace and Peace” combined a Christianized form of the Greek and Hebrew greetings (Shepherd’s Notes).

After receiving unlimited, undeserved forgiveness (grace) when meeting Christ on the Damascus road, Paul’s heart received a transformation. Upon following a new leader, Paul strove to fulfill his calling of sharing the Good News of Christ by aligning himself with God’s directives.

So What?

The same Jesus Christ who “set Paul apart” also invites us to be “saints”—set apart, holy, dedicated for His service; whether through formal or informal ministry. It is a great privilege and responsibility to share our Father’s Good News: Forgiveness and eternal life are a gift of God’s grace—received through faith in Christ—available to all.

I like the following excerpt from my NIV Study Bible: “God did not waste any part of Paul—his background, his training, his citizenship, his mind, or even his weaknesses. Are you willing to let God do the same for you? You will never know all He can do with you until you allow him to have all that you are!”

Overview of Romans

In my last poll someone suggested I post a Bible study. Thus begins this journey. Beginning next week I will sequentially list the given Scripture passage. I won’t write out the entire passage, but may quote a verse or two, add interesting facts, expand on a given concept, and/or add poetry about the topic/passage.

I usually post every Friday, but with a Bible Study, I plan on writing a little every two-three days. I’d love for you to join me and welcome your comments.

The New Testament book of Romans seems a great starting point after exploring “Evangelism”.

Romans In a Nutshell

Sinners are saved only by faith in Jesus Christ.

Sinners are saved only by faith in Jesus Christ.

Like a skilled lawyer, the apostle Paul presents the Good News—we are saved by grace (undeserved, unearned favor from God) through faith (complete trust) in Christ and His finished work on the cross. He further explains how this knowledge and living by the Holy Spirit’s power should affect our daily living.

Paul, like the other apostles, had never visited the church in Rome, but he had taken the gospel “from Jerusalem all the way around to Illyricum” (15:19). He planned to visit and preach in Rome someday. He also hoped to continue taking the gospel further westward to Spain. It’s unclear if Paul ever reached Spain or if he was executed in Rome after the end of the book of Acts.

roman-empire-map

The church in Rome began by Jews who came to faith during the Pentecost (Acts 2). A great number of Gentile converts also joined this growing church. Paul felt a bond with these Christian Romans, even though miles and obstacles separated them. In his letter, Paul introduces himself before presenting an organized and clear statement of his faith in Jesus Christ.

Statistics Please

  • Author: The apostle Paul
  • Date: About 57 AD, from Corinth near the end of Paul’s third missionary journey
  • Audience: Believers in Rome and believers everywhere
  • Purpose: 1) Paul was seeking support for his planned visit to Spain (15:24,28); 2) Paul sought to encourage the Romans to greater unity (14:1-15:13); 3) Paul wanted to explain his theology to the Romans and apply it to daily life issues.

Major Themes in Romans

  • Natural revelation – 1:20
  • The wrath of God – Ch. 1
  • A righteousness from God – Ch. 2
  • Abraham, a man of faith – Ch. 4
  • The benefits of believing – Ch. 12-15
  • Does justification by faith promote sin? Ch. 6
  • Life in the Spirit – Ch. 8
  • The triumph of believing – 8:26-30
  • What about the Jews?
  • Practical Christianity – Ch. 12
  • The obligations of love – Ch. 13

Hope you’ll join me next week!

 

Three Effective Evangelism Plans (Part 5)

Along with Billy Graham’s plan “Steps to Peace with God,” which I posted last week, the following plans have helped millions of Christians share the Gospel in a simple, but effective way.

1) The Romans Road of Salvation
  • Human Need (Rom. 3:23)
  • Sin’s Penalty (Rom. 6:23)
  • God’s Provision (Rom. 5:8)
  • The Person’s Response (Rom. 10:9)

 

2) Four Spiritual Laws (Campus Crusade for Christ)
  • God loves you and offers a wonderful plan for your life (John 3:16; 10:10).diagram_2
  • Humans are sinful and separated from God. Thus, they cannot know and experience God’s love and plan for their lives (Rom. 3:23; 6:23).
  • Jesus Christ is God’s only provision for humanity’s sin. Through Jesus, you can know and experience God’s love and plan for your life (Rom. 5:8; John 14:6).
  • We must individually receive Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord; then we can know and experience God’s love and plan for our lives (John 1:12; Eph. 2:8-9).
3) Bridge to Life (Navigators Resource/Tool link: http://www.navigators.org/Tools)bridge-illustration
  • The Bible teaches that God loves all humans and wants them to know Him (John 10:10; Rom. 5:1).
  • But humans have sinned against God and are separated from God and His love. This separation leads only to death and judgment (Rom. 3:23; Isa. 59:2).
  • But there is a solution: Jesus Christ died on the cross for our sins (the bridge between humanity and God) (1 Peter 3:18; 1 Tim. 2:5; Rom. 5:8).
  • Only those who personally receive Jesus Christ into their lives, trusting Him to forgive their sins, can cross this bridge. Everyone must decide individually whether to receive Christ (John 3:16; John 5:24).

William Brent Ashby’s reference, 24 Ways to Explain the Gospel (Rose Publishing), is also great resource that uses word pictures. He highlights biblical illustrations and metaphors to clarify difficult concepts about salvation in a fold-out pamphlet. You can find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Ways-Explain-Gospel-Rose-Publishing/dp/1596363525

This wraps up my Evangelism series. Please come back next week for a new study. Have a fun and safe Memorial weekend!

Evangelism Plans (Part 4)

Although evangelism plans vary, the truth of the message must not. While false teachers flourish, it’s important to know and guard the main doctrinal points of the Bible (1 Tim. 4:1-3, 16). Any tampering with the Bible’s message will be under God’s scrutiny and judgment (Dt. 4:2; Rev. 22:18-19).

How Many Roads to Salvation?
"There is a way that seems right to a man, but in the end it leads to death."  - Proverbs 14:12

“There is a way that seems right to a man, but in the end it leads to death.” – Proverbs 14:12

One hiccup that many people have with Christianity is the “narrow viewpoint” that Jesus Christ is the only way to salvation. Matthew 7:13-14 not only agrees with this narrow viewpoint, but admonishes us to go there: “Enter by the narrow gate; for the gate is wide, and the way is broad that leads to destruction, and many are those who enter by it. For the gate is small, and the way is narrow that leads to life, and few are those who find it.”

Many believe that a loving God won’t turn anyone away who has done his/her lion share of good deeds and/or has achieved much in life. This is a dangerous assumption. A great resource that addresses what’s wrong with this popular theory is Andy Stanley’s book, How Good is Good Enough?

Jesus, the Only Way

Gregory Koukle addresses critics who embrace religious pluralism in his booklet, Jesus the Only Way: “. . . . When a hundred [Bible] passages argue the same point [Jesus the only way] from a variety of angles it cannot be mistaken, only ignored.”

Everyone follows something or someone. When one receives eternal life through Christ, it’s important that he/she realizes that he/she isn’t just saved unto salvation, but also is receiving a new leader—Jesus Christ— to follow.

Billy Graham Crusades Evangelism plan

Billy Graham Crusades “Steps to Peace with God” emphasizes four simple steps:

  1. God’s Plan–> Peace and Life (Rom. 5:1; John 3:16; 10:10)
  2. Humanity’s Problem–> Separation (Rom. 3:23; 6:23; Isa. 59:2)
  3. God’s Remedy–> The Cross (1 Tim. 2:5; 1 Peter 3:18; Rom. 5:8)
  4. Human Response–> Receive Christ (John 1:12; 5:24; Rom. 10:9)

Billy Graham Crusades also offers free tracts and hosts online evangelistic resources:

  • A downloadable worksheet to help share “Your Faith Story”
  • A customizable downloadable tract
  • Examples of how the Grahams have shared their faith story
  • How God uses ordinary people in extraordinary ways
  • Short videos with different styles that share the Good News

You can check out their resources here:

https://secure.billygraham.org/testimony-tract/testimony-tract.aspx?SOURCE=BY120TTCG&gclid=CI-h4s-jlb4CFcuVfgod6D8ANA

Next week, I’ll wrap this series up with some other evangelism plans to check out.

Any thoughts, questions, comments?

My week has flown by with my boys’ baseball games and daughter’s play. It’s been a crazy-busy, but fun week. While driving my kids around, the thought occurred: I’m grateful that most drivers heed the law to drive on the right side of the road, the correct/one way to drive on a U.S. highway. Similarly, I’m grateful God made a way—even though it’s the only way—to receive forgiveness and eternal life through His son, Jesus.

May your week be fun, full and sane!

 

Philip the Evangelist (Part 3)

I’ve always wondered what went through Philip the Evangelist’s mind when WHOOSH, he found himself transported to Azotus via the Holy Spirit. After sharing the Good News and baptizing an Ethiopian treasurer, POOF, “the Spirit of the Lord suddenly took Philip away” (Acts 8:39). He learned first-hand that God isn’t limited in the ways He uses His children. (The entire story is recorded in Acts 8:26-40.)

We’ll probably never share Philip’s means of express transportation; yes, there’s the rapture, but that’s a different subject! However, we can learn from Philip’s obedience to God.

"Remain in me, and I will remain in you. No branch can bear fruit by itself; it must remain in the vine. Neither can you bear fruit unless you remain in me. I am the vine; you are the branches. If a man remains in me and I in him, he will bear much fruit; apart from me you can do nothing."  - John 15:4-5

“Remain in me, and I will remain in you. No branch can bear fruit by itself; it must remain in the vine. Neither can you bear fruit unless you remain in me. I am the vine; you are the branches. If a man remains in me and I in him, he will bear much fruit; apart from me you can do nothing.” – John 15:4-5

Acts 8:40 records Philip preaching the gospel in all the towns near Azotus, where God whirled him away. Perhaps God knew He could count on Philip’s obedience to proclaim the Good News.

Philip not only obeyed Jesus’ command to spread the Gospel, but also heeded Jesus’ example of only acting and saying what the Father directs:

For I did not speak of my own accord, but the Father who sent me commanded me what to say and how to say it. I know that His command leads to eternal life. So whatever I say is just what the Father has told me to say.”   -John 12:49-50

Philip’s example offers us several lessons:
  • We have the same Holy Spirit to teach and empower us to be an effective witness for Christ.
  • Upon persecution, Philip went directly to Samaria—a forbidden place to most Jews due to prejudice—and spread the gospel. The gospel is for everyone, not for a select few.
  • In the middle of his successful evangelism efforts, God’s directive for him to go south on the desert road must have first seemed like a demotion. But because of Philip’s willingness to hear God’s voice and obey—going near the Ethiopian treasurer’s chariot and engaging him in discussion—God placed a Christian (the treasurer) in a significant position in a distant country. Perhaps the entire nation was then influenced by the Good News.
  • Interestingly, Philip only used the Old Testament in leading this man to faith in Christ even though Jesus is found in both the Old and New Testaments.
  • Philip met this man where he was—immersed in the prophecies of Isaiah—and then helped clarify the passage as he shared how Jesus fulfilled that prophecy.
  • When sharing the Gospel, a great place to start is where the other person’s concerns and/or questions lie.
  • God finds great and various uses for those who obey Him wholeheartedly.
  • Like Philip, we can take advantage of the opportunities God gives us through active listening and obedience.

Following God may be risky and difficult at times, but I’m sure Philip would testify: It’s worth the ride!

Next week I’ll explore some simple evangelism plans that have helped many Christians share their faith.

Evangelism (part 2)—The Message

Hi friends! I hope this Friday finds you well. The following is a recap from last week’s post:

  • Evangelism is not reserved just for the pastor or professional.
  • The gifts of teaching and evangelism are closely related.
  • Only God can save and transform souls.
  • Although living a quiet, godly life honors God, evangelism requires words—with respect and gentleness—in addition to service.
  • Leslie Flynn, 19 Gifts of the Spirit, defines evangelism:

The gift of proclaiming the Good News of salvation effectively so that people respond to the claims of Christ in conversion and in discipleship.”

What is this Good News Message?

The short, but sweet truth: Jesus came to save us!

This message should appeal to both the emotions and intellect. A longer version, such as below, tells of the historic event that can bring incomparable riches both today and in the future:

Jesus Christ—God and man—died on the cross for my sins over nineteen centuries ago. He was buried and rose the third day. If through faith, I receive Christ as my Savior, God will declare me righteous through Jesus’ shedding of His blood. God the Father will accept His Son’s sacrifice as full satisfaction for the guilt and penalty of my sin. This is a free gift, which can’t be earned or deserved. Because I am no longer under the penalty of the Old Covenant’s broken law, I am pardoned once and for all. God also adopts me as His child. He strengthens me through the ministry of His Holy Spirit, which indwells and regenerates my inner being.

What are some Bible verses that speak about our fallen, sinful nature and God’s plan to save/redeem us?

Salvation Verses

The following verses speak about our sin and the wages of sin, God’s grace and justification, provision and salvation through faith in Jesus Christ:

  • Wages of sin: Romans 5:12; Romans 3:23; Romans 6:23a
  • God’s wrath & spiritual death toward the disbelieving: John 3:36; 1 John 5:12-13
  • Grace and justification: Ephesians 2:8-9; Romans 3:24; Romans 6:23b
  • Jesus’ provision for our sin: Romans 5:8; 1 Corinthians 15:1-4; John 3:17
  • Eternal life through faith in Jesus Christ: John 3:36a; John 3:16; John 1:12; Ephesians 2:8-9; Romans 6:23; Romans 10:8-10; 1 John 5:11
  • Confession of belief in Christ: Romans 10:10; Matthew 10:32

Next week I’ll explore more on this topic. Have a wonderful week!

Four Factors in Evangelism (Part 1)

Jesus’ final instructions to His disciples after His resurrection, before returning to His Father in heaven, was to go and make more disciples, “teaching them to obey everything I [Jesus] have commanded,” (Matthew 28:16-20; Mark 16:15-18).

With this same authority, Jesus still commands us to tell others the Good News and make disciples for His kingdom. This is His Great Commission.

"For the Son of Man came to seek and to save the lost."      Luke 19:10

“For the Son of Man came to seek and to save the lost.”                     Luke 19:10

Leslie Flynn, author of 19 Gifts of the Spirit, defines evangelism as the following:

The gift of proclaiming the Good News of salvation effectively so that people respond to the claims of Christ in conversion and in discipleship.”

Four Factors in Evangelism
  1. Proclamation . . . . In addition to Christian witness through works, evangelism requires words: explanation of how a sinner becomes right with God; Christ’s historical, redemptive death and resurrection. The gift communicates the gospel with power so people are brought into the experience of salvation with knowledge of spiritual life and death. Hearers may or may not be emotionally moved, but the intellect must not be bypassed. How we proclaim is extremely important. 1 Peter 3:15 (NIV) says, “Always be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks you to give the reason for the hope that you have. But do this with gentleness and respect.”
  2. Good News . . . . The word gospel comes from the Greek words, well and announcement, which means “good announcement” or “Good News”.
  3. Effectively Resulting in Conversion . . . . Campus Crusade for Christ defines witnessing success as: “sharing Christ in the power of the Spirit and leaving the results to Him.” Only God can bring spiritual understanding and conversion. There will not be a response every time we witness, but the hearer should understand that a decision must be made: Accept or reject Christ.
  4. Discipleship . . . . Dedicated evangelists and organizations have systematic follow-up plans to help new converts grow in their faith and connect with the local church.

Evangelism is not reserved just for the pastor or professional. Campus Crusade estimates it takes 1,000 laymen and six pastors one year to win one convert to Christ. Philip, the only person called an evangelist in the Bible, was a deacon. And interestingly, the early church grew in numbers by a lay movement (Acts 8).

Teaching and Evangelism are Closely Related

Evangelism is referred to teaching several places in Acts. Hearers wanted to know much about Jesus before putting their faith in Him, (Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, Mich.). Church historians observe that evangelistic surges throughout the centuries result from sound theological advances.

Even if we do not possess the gift of evangelism, we are told to do the work of an evangelist (Mark 1:17). Some people are more effective in personal evangelism. Others may be most effective in group evangelism—such as Billy Graham—or cross cultural evangelism.

What is your experience with evangelism? Have you shared the Good News with anyone lately? Who shared the Good News with you? How has that impacted you?

*Next few posts: The message and methods in evangelism . . . . Have a great week!

 

Why did Jesus die?

Thank you to everyone who participated in my poll two weeks ago. The tallies are in . . . Drum roll . . . The winner? It’s a tie. Looks like all four categories will share the platform:

  • Bible Study . . . . 25%
  • Original pictures . . . . 25%
  • “Surprise me” . . . . 25%
  • Other: Evangelism . . . . 25%

***

I thought on this Good Friday, Jesus’ own words about His death, burial, and resurrection pave the perfect way for studying evangelism, which will be my topic for the next few weeks.

 Jesus Explains Why He Must Die: John 12:23-33 (NIV)

The hour has come for the Son of Man to be glorified. I tell you the truth, unless a kernel of wheat falls to the ground and dies, it remains only a single seed. But if it dies, it produces many seeds. The man who loves his life will lose it, while the man who hates his life in this world will keep it for eternal life. Whoever serves me must follow me; and where I am, my servant also will be. My Father will honor the one who serves me . . . . Now my heart is troubled, and what shall I say? ‘Father, save me from this hour?’ No, it was for this very reason I came to this hour. Father, glorify your name! . . . . (vs. 32-33) But I, when I am lifted up from the earth, will draw all men to myself.”

Living in an area surrounded by beautiful rolling hills of wheat, I appreciate and relate to Jesus’ word picture.

Living in an area surrounded by beautiful rolling hills of wheat, I appreciate and relate to Jesus’ word picture.

Unless a kernel of wheat is buried, it will not take root and become a blade of wheat producing many more seeds. Seeds generally store energy. When the seed is planted, the bit of energy within is sacrificed in order to establish the new plant.

Similarly, Jesus’ ultimate sacrifice was dying in our place. 2 Corinthians 5:21 says, For He (God) made Him (Jesus) who knew no sin to be sin for us, that we might become the righteousness of God in Him.

We celebrate Jesus’ resurrection and victory over death at Easter. Because He is the sinless Son of God who paid our sins’ death penalty, He alone offers forgiveness and eternal life to all who believe in Him.

In response to His sacrifice, Jesus calls us to follow Him by crucifying our sin and self-centeredness. God is raising a crop of righteousness. Jesus sets the perfect example of service in John 13 as He washes His disciples’ feet—a job that was reserved for the lowliest slave. Although it sounds like an oxymoron, the hard work of transferring control of our lives to Christ by serving God is worth all effort and discomfort. When we embrace Christ and His ways we receive eternal life, genuine peace, lasting joy, and showcase Christ to others.

Is there anything in your life that needs to die in order to experience the fruit of God’s joy and peace?

Benefits of Suffering

kdmanes:

             Shannon Moreno’s post, Benefits of Suffering, really ties into the theme of Faith Writers’ book, Trials and Triumphs. Shannon has also written a great inspirational book called: Finding the Light (Prayerful Poetry). You can find it here: http://revelationsinwriting.wordpress.com

But before you read Shannon’s post, a little business is in order: CONGRATULATIONS . . . .
SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES
You’re the WINNER of:

Trials_&_Triumphs_Final_Cover

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Speaking of trials, I’d appreciate your prayers for our neighbors’ family and community. Our neighbor (a special dad, grandpa, farmer) was recently killed in an ATV accident. Our small community mourns his loss, and has seen more than our share of tragedies in recent years . . . . Thank you.

 

Originally posted on Revelations In Writing:

Trials and troubles touch the lives of everyone, eventually. Often, when the struggles squeeze, people begin to wonder why. Though I know not all the answers, I appreciate the footnotes found for 2 Corinthians 4:17  that speak of the following benefits of our suffering: (1) They remind us of Christ’s suffering for us; (2) they keep us from pride; (3) they cause us to look beyond this brief life; (4) they prove our faith to others; and (5) they give God the opportunity to demonstrate His power.

“For our light and momentary troubles are achieving for us an eternal glory that far outweighs them all. So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen. For what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal.” – (2 Corinthians 4:17-18)

Not only should we recognize the opportunities presented in our suffering, but also…

View original 349 more words

Trials and Triumphs book give-away

Yes, I promised last week I would give away Faith Writers Trials and Triumphs to a lucky winner.Trials_&_Triumphs_Final_Cover For those of you who would like more information on this book, click on Amazon’s link: Trials and Triumphs. I am privileged to have my testimony included in this anthology along with 39 other writers. Although we are a diverse group, we share a unifying saving grace in the person of Jesus Christ.

But first, will you please fill out my poll? Don’t forget to click “vote”. I greatly appreciate your feedback! (Don’t worry, your name won’t appear when you vote, only percentages.)

Blessings,

K.D.

 

 

 

 

 

Seven Primary Spiritual Gifts

We have different gifts, according to the grace given us. If a man’s gift is prophesying, let him use it in proportion to his faith. If it is serving, let him serve; if it is teaching, let him teach; if it is encouraging, let him encourage; if it is contributing to the needs of others, let him give generously; if it is leadership, let him govern diligently; if it is showing mercy, let him do it cheerfully.”          Romans 12:6-8 (NIV)

Every believer has one primary motivational gift

According to the above passage, the seven motivational gifts are:

  1. Prophecy
  2. Service
  3. Teaching
  4. Encouragement
  5. Giving
  6. Leadership
  7. Mercy

Not only does the Bible command the church to lovingly exercise all seven of these motivational gifts, but every believer also needs these seven areas in order to grow as God desires.

Do you know your primary motivational gift? It’s our job to discover what that gift is. Spiritual gift inventories may be helpful, but I’ve found the best way is to jump in and try an area of service that seems fitting, (see God’s Masterpiece & Sublime Design).

Taking a class at church and/or talking to someone who knows you well will also help you discover your primary gift. I really like how our church encourages and gives people permission to volunteer for 90 days in an area of service. By the end of three months, the individual has a pretty good idea if he/she has that particular gift. If it’s not a good fit, we’re encouraged to try another area of ministry.

We are most effective for Christ when we lovingly use the gift(s) He has given us, (see 1 Corinthians 13). But this shouldn’t be an excuse for not occasionally taking out the trash, or lending a helping hand for someone whose primary gift isn’t service.

I love that God shapes us uniquely. Our gifts will look differently in the way they are expressed through a variety of ministry. When we exercise our gifts through ministry, the Holy Spirit is the One who determines what impact another believer will receive (1 Corinthians 12:8-11).

How do you know what your primary gift is?

The following indicators result when you exercise your primary gift:

  • Joy
  • Fruitfulness

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 Next week I invite you to take a poll on whether you want to explore more on the specifics of spiritual gifts. Also, I’ll give you the opportunity to win a FREE COPY of Faith Writer’s Trials and Triumphs. So spread the word and come back next Friday! Have a great week!  – K.D.

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God’s Plan for Spiritual Gifts

You are a paintbrush. God uses the paintbrush in your hand (your gifts) to help change and transform others in the body of Christ. And God uses others in your life to make you like Christ.”  – Chip Ingram

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God’s ultimate makeover is to produce the life of Christ

I found Chip Ingram’s analogy of spiritual gifts and paintbrushes interesting (Your Divine Design). This is my paraphrase:

  • Some believers’ gifts are like a paint roller: although they may not be as personal, they are more effective in a large group setting with their broad paint strokes
  • Some believers’ spiritual gifts are more like a refined artist, patiently painting detailed color and techniques on an individual’s canvas/heart.

You get the picture . . . . There are different paintbrushes for specific jobs; God uses different spiritual gifts for His specific purposes.

1 Corinthians 12:4-6 (NIV) says: There are different kinds of gifts, but the same Spirit. There are different kinds of service, but the same Lord. There are different kinds of working, but the same God works all of them in all men.

Where does God do His extreme makeover?
  • In His people—the church (Ephesians 2:18-22)
  • In the believer’s heart (Ephesians 3:14-19)
How does God do His extreme makeover?

Jesus’ victory over sin, death, and Satan is witnessed through spiritual gifts in His church (Ephesians 4:7-13).

10 Principles for Understanding Spiritual Gifts

(Source: Chip Ingram)

  1. Every Christian has one or more spiritual gifts.
  2. Many believers have received more than one spiritual gift.
  3. Spiritual gifts are given the moment of regeneration, but they may lie undiscovered and dormant for a long period of time.
  4. Spiritual gifts can be abused and neglected, but if they are received at regeneration, it would appear that they cannot be lost.
  5. Spiritual gifts are not the same as the gift of the Holy Spirit.
  6. Spiritual gifts are not the same as the fruit of the Spirit.
  7. Spiritual gifts are not the same as natural talents.
  8. Some spiritual gifts are more useful in local churches than others because they result in greater edification of the body.
  9. Charismata literally means “grace gifts”. These gifts are sovereignly and undeservedly given by the Holy Spirit.
  10. Gifts are God’s spiritual equipment for effective service and edification of the body [church].

Do any of these 10 principles surprise you? If so, which ones? Why?

Related posts:

God’s Plans—Where? How?

Last week we looked at Ephesians 2:1-10 to find the who, what, and why of God’s plan/purpose in giving believers spiritual gifts: Who and what we used to be without Christ, who and what we are in Christ, and why does God do an extreme makeover in us?

This second post will focus on where and how God does His extreme makeover as a background to spiritual gifts.

Where does God do His extreme makeover?

  • God does His extreme makeover in His people—the church

Ephesians 2:18-22 (NIV): For through Him we both have access to the Father by one Spirit. Consequently, you are no longer foreigners and aliens, but fellow citizens with God’s people and members of God’s household, built on the foundation of the apostles and prophets, with Christ Jesus Himself as the chief cornerstone. In Him the whole building is joined together and rises to become a holy temple in the Lord. And in Him you too are being built together to become a dwelling in which God lives by His Spirit.

  • God does His extreme makeover in the heart

Ephesians 3:14-19: For this reason I kneel before the Father, from whom His whole family in heaven and on earth derives its name. I pray that out of His glorious riches He may strengthen you with power through His Spirit in your inner being, so that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith. And I pray that you, being rooted and established in love, may have power, together with all the saints, to grasp how wide and long and high and deep is the love of Christ, and to know this love that surpasses knowledge—that you may be filled to the measure of all the fullness of God.  PENTAX ImageHow does God do extreme makeovers?

  • Jesus’ victory over sin, death, and Satan is witnessed through spiritual gifts in His church

Ephesians 4:7-13: But to each one of us grace has been given as Christ apportioned it. This is why it says: “When He ascended on high, He led captives in His train and gave gifts to men. (What does “He ascended” mean except that He also descended to the lower, earthly regions? He who descended is the very one who ascended higher than all the heavens, in order to fill the whole universe.) It was He who gave some to be apostles, some to be prophets, some to be evangelists, and some to be pastors and teachers, to prepare God’s people for works of service, so that the body of Christ may be built up until we all reach unity in the faith and in the knowledge of the Son of God and become mature, attaining to the whole measure of the fullness of Christ.

According to Ephesians 2:18-22, what is the church?

Have you ever been helped by someone using their spiritual gift?

*Next week: Principles for understanding spiritual gifts.

God’s Plans—Who Me? What? Why?

Good news! Faithwriters Trials and Triumphs is now available for purchase on Amazon. You can view and purchase the book here:
http://www.amazon.com/Trials-Triumphs-Circumstances-Life-Changing-Testimonies/dp/099148840/ref=la_B00E3DHXTG_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1393806056&sr=1-3

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Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation; the old has gone, the new has come!”  – 2 Corinthians 5:17 (NIV)

Rain Princess by By Leonid Afremov (Etsy.com)

Rain Princess by By Leonid Afremov (Etsy.com)

God—master artist, architect, builder, designer—knows exactly where and how to apply His creative techniques on us, His canvas. I like Chip Ingram’s analogy (Your Divine Design, Living on the Edge): “Believers [in Christ] are in process . . . process of an extreme makeover.”

In order to understand God’s plan/purpose in giving believers spiritual gifts, we need to first understand the context.

Who? What?

Ephesians 2:1-3 explains who we used to be:

  • As for you, you were dead in your transgressions and sins, in which you used to live when you followed the ways of this world and of the ruler of the kingdom of the air, the spirit who is now at work in those who are disobedient. All of us also lived among them at one time, gratifying the cravings of our sinful nature and following its desires and thoughts [prisoners of the world system].  Like the rest, we were by nature objects of wrath.

 Ephesians 2:4-6 explains who we are now in Christ:

  • But because of His great love for us, God, who is rich in mercy, made us alive with Christ even when we were dead in transgressions—it is by grace you have been saved. And God raised us up with Christ and seated us with Him in the heavenly realms in Christ Jesus.

Why an extreme makeover?

Ephesians 2:7-10 explains God’s purpose:

  • . . . in order that in the coming ages He might show the incomparable riches of His grace, expressed in His kindness to us in Christ Jesus. For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith—and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God—not by works, so that no one can boast.
  • For we are God’s workmanship, created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do.  (vs. 10)

Is your life different now because of Jesus? How?

What work is God doing in you?

More to come: “Where and how does God do extreme makeovers?”

Plans – What does the Bible say?

He [God] does have surprising, secret purposes. I open a Bible, and His plans, startling, lie there barefaced. It’s hard to believe it, when I read it, and I have to come back to it many times, feel long across those words, make sure they are real. His love letter forever silences any doubts: His secret purpose framed from the very beginning [is] to bring us to our full glory” (1 Corinthians 2:7 NEB).”
Ann Voskamp, One Thousand Gifts: A Dare to Live Fully Right Where You Are

f96657d9087eeb784d83297772cb6a9aHow are your New Year’s resolutions going? My exercise/diet resolve has wavered a few times since January 1. But I’m getting back on that horse! Past times I’ve reasoned: If I ditch my plan then I can’t fail! (Yes, this is an area God is patiently working with me on.)

Plans . . . . Are you a planner? God is. Just as He has purposed to save and sanctify us, He also has specific plans in which He wants to use us—individually and corporately—in His kingdom service. His plans require us to die to ourselves, but when we follow Him, we experience the highest calling, greatest joy, and purposeful living possible.

I’m planning a plan series for my next few posts. Yes I know, it sounds nerdy, but God’s Word is worth exploring this topic amongst others. The following is my rough outline:

  • God’s plan involving spiritual gifts
  • Aligning our plans with God’s purposes
  • Monitoring and adjusting our plans
  • What about when our plans fail?

Have you made any plans lately? How are your plans going? Do you have a specific area you’d like to explore on this broad topic? I’m willing to dive in if you are!

Have a wonderful week!

God’s Works

www.pinterest.comGod didn’t put a small amount of thought and effort into creating the universe and creating us.

Brian Clegg from The Observer wrote (Saturday 26, January 2013): “Many of the most exciting discoveries in all fields of science are being played out in the human body.”

Interesting discoveries about the body (Brien Clegg)

  • An adult is made up of around 7,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (7 octillion) atoms.
  • Just like a chicken, your life started off with an egg. Not a chunky thing in a shell, but an egg nonetheless. However, there is a significant difference between a human egg and a chicken egg that has a surprising effect on your age. Human eggs are tiny. They are, after all, just a single cell and are typically around 0.2mm across – about the size of a printed full stop. Your egg was formed in your mother – but the surprising thing is that it was formed when she was an embryo. The formation of your egg, and the half of your DNA that came from your mother, could be considered as the very first moment of your existence. And it happened before your mother was born. Say your mother was 30 when she had you, then on your 18th birthday you were arguably over 48 years old.
  • We are used to thinking of genes as being the controlling factor that determines what each of us is like physically, but genes are only a tiny part of our DNA. The other 97% was thought to be junk until recently, but we now realise that epigenetics – the processes that go on outside the genes – also have a major influence on our development. Some parts act to control “switches” that turn genes on and off, or program the production of other key compounds. For a long time it was a puzzle how around 20,000 genes (far fewer than some breeds of rice) were enough to specify exactly what we were like. The realization now is that the other 97% of our DNA is equally important.

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Next time you feel unimportant, remember the One who fashioned you: “You created my inmost being: you knit me together in my mother’s womb. I praise you because I am fearfully and wonderfully made; your works are wonderful, I know that full well. My frame was not hidden from you when I was made in the secret place. When I was woven together in the depths of the earth, your eyes saw my unformed body. All the days ordained for me were written in your book before one of them came to be.”    Psalm 139:13-16

Do you have as much respect for yourself as your Maker does for you? God has a special purpose and plan for your life.

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Power of Love

The power of love is a curious thing. Make one man weep, make another man sing.”

I remember well this catchy tune by Huey Lewis and the News in the eighties. No matter the genre—music or literature—love is the most celebrated, analyzed, and agonized topic. 218187_364190660328477_349698182_nEveryone desires to love and be loved. And there is no shortage of advice about how to love and/or how to be loved. But what does the Bible say about love?

*The following article is used with permission. ©2014 United Church of God, an International Association. Published as a free educational service in the public interest. http://www.ucg.org/booklet/marriage-and-family-missing-dimension/divorce-proof-your-marriage/different-kinds-love-menti/

The Different Kinds of Love Mentioned in the Bible

The Greek language in which the New Testament was written uses several words translated “love.” The first two listed below are found in the New Testament. Understanding their meanings helps us better comprehend God’s expectations of us.

Agapao (verb) is a special word representing the divine love of God toward His Son, human beings in general and believers. It is also used to depict the outwardly focused love God expects believers to have for one another. Agapao (including its noun form, agape ) is “the characteristic word of Christianity, and since the Spirit of revelation has used it to express ideas previously unknown, inquiry into its use, whether in Greek literature or in the Septuagint, throws but little light upon its distinctive meaning in the New Testament . . .”

This special type of Christian love, “whether exercised toward the brethren, or toward men generally, is not an impulse from the feelings, it does not always run with the natural inclinations, nor does it spend itself only upon those for whom some affinity is discovered” (Vine’s Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words, “Love”).

Reflecting the fact that human marriage is modeled after the divine relationship between Christ and the Church, husbands are told to love their wives with this kind of outgoing, selfless love (Ephesians 5:25, 31-32).

This kind of love is perhaps best expressed in Jesus Christ’s statement in John 15:13, “Greater love [agape] has no one than this, than to lay down one’s life for his friends.” Jesus Himself perfectly exemplified this kind of love throughout His lifetime, continually giving of Himself and His time and energies to serve others and ultimately offering up His life as a sacrifice for all of humanity. This is the kind of love God wants each of us to exemplify in our lives and particularly in our marriages.

Phileo (verb) means “‘to have ardent affection and feeling’—a type of impulsive love” (Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary , 1995, “Love”). This is the natural, human type of love and affection that we have for a friend and is often defined as “brotherly love.”

In John 21:15-16, Jesus asked Peter if he loved Him with the agapao type of love and Peter responded that he had the normal human phileo type of love for Him. Later, after receiving the Holy Spirit, Peter would be able to genuinely demonstrate agapao -type godly love, serving others throughout his lifetime and making the ultimate sacrifice in martyrdom.

Eros (noun) refers to sexual, erotic love or desire.

True love, as explained in the Bible, isn’t focused on oneself and one’s feelings or emotions, but is instead outwardly focused on others —wanting to best serve and care for them. True love is beautifully described in 1 Corinthians 13:4-8: “Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It is not rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres. Love never fails” (NIV). 425239_457108351048200_531874565_n

Trials and Triumphs

Simplicity was a popular trend in 2013, ranging from simplifying gadgets to simple and clean architectural lines. We desire to simplify and understand the why’s in our complex world. For life is anything but simple.

Complexity

How can a person press on despite crippling illness, abusive relationships, the loss of a child, or even the confusion of homosexuality? Does God sometimes forget us, leaving us to maneuver through a muddled painful maze? Or is He near, guiding and supporting us in the middle of the mess?

Trials and Triumphs Trials_&_Triumphs_Final_Cover

I’ve been blessed to be a part of FaithWriters online community. I’m also honored to have my testimony included in their new book, Trials and Triumphs, along with 39 other people facing daily challenges.

In the “Coming to Faith” section, there are stories about discovering the need for a personal Savior. In the “Faith Under Fire” section, you will discover how God helped many people—including me—through various problems.

Trials and Triumphs will be released soon in book format. I will let you know when it’s available for purchase. For information about contributors, author links can be found here: Trials and Triumphs.

Come and journey with us through our challenges, victories, and intimate God-realizing moments. There is hope for the confused, abused, downtrodden, and for those who are suffering.

I hope you have a great week!

K.D.

Growing in Faith

We find God to be the One on whom we can depend to bring us to our destined goal, and One who already in Christ gives us rest for our souls.”

God doesn’t call us to a neurotic dependency on Christ, but rather a simple childlike trust. Rather than automated fulfillment of rules and rituals, He desires that we develop a fulfilling relationship with Him, rooted and ignited in faith (Romans 1:17).

Faith is being sure of what we hope for and certain of what we do not see.”  – Hebrews 11:1

These two qualities—sure and certain—have a secure beginning and ending point.

Beginning Point of Faith

Receiving Christ as Lord is the seed that contains life with Christ. Our faith and salvation are not drummed up by self-determination. They are gifts from God (Ephesians 2:8-9).

Mary, Mary Quite Contrary . . .
(Napa Valley Vineyard by Jim G., Flickr)

(Napa Valley Vineyard by Jim G., Flickr)

How does your faith grow?

Faith blossoms through the following:

  • Believe in Christ’s Perfect Character: Jesus doesn’t just save us the moment of our salvation, but continues saving us . . . freeing us from captivity to sin, ourselves, and Satan’s deception. “So then, just as you received Christ Jesus as Lord, continue to live in him, rooted and built up in him, strengthened in the faith as you were taught, and overflowing with thankfulness. See to it that no one takes you captive through hollow and deceptive philosophy, which depends on human tradition and the basic principles of this world rather than on Christ. For in Christ all the fullness of the Deity lives in bodily form, and you have been given fullness in Christ, who is the head over every power and authority,”  Colossians 2:6-9.
  • Meet Together: “Do not give up meeting together, as some are in the habit of doing, but encourage one another—and all the more as you see the Day approaching,” (Hebrews 10:25). We all struggle and falter at times. An infant doesn’t start out running . . . . Neither do we spiritually. When one falls down, let’s help each other up.
  • Abide in Christ: John 15:1-10 depicts a vineyard with Jesus as the true vine, God the Father as the gardener, and us as 7ced8b92bf7312392af52a495b28b9d8the branches. Jesus said, “If you remain in me and I in you, you will bear much fruit; apart from me you can do nothing” (vs. 5). We remain in Christ by submitting to him through prayer and obedience. Our faithfulness to the will of God in this life will be examined in the next life (Daniel 7:10; Revelation 20:12).
  • Hear God’s Word: “Faith comes from hearing the message, and the message is heard through the word of Christ,” (Romans 10:17).

End Point of Faith

Lastly, believing in God’s promises anchors our hope in Him, resulting in life and peace.

Which promises of God have helped you lately?

Peace Through Christ

Whether we’re shopping for insurance, cars, clothes, or a house, we want the best bang for the the buck . . . the complete package.

The Apostle Paul wrote the New Testament book of Colossians not only to combat errors in the church, but also to show believers that everything we need is found in Jesus Christ.

One of the strongest statements about Christ is found in the following reference:

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Jesus—the express image of the invisible God—is equal with the Father. He is pre-existent, omnipotent, and eternal. He not only desires a relationship with us, but also deserves to be our highest priority. Jesus Christ, the fullness of God, is the power source for living the Christian life. He is our leader and the head of the church.

Jesus is the most comprehensive, perfect, and complete package “in whom are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge” (Colossians 2:3).

Unlike the most expensive car, clothing, or house, He offers us eternal life free of charge. Christ’s gift of salvation and forgiveness covers us now and throughout eternity. We don’t even have to meet a deductible to receive these benefits. This is by far the greatest, most gracious offer ever given.

Salvation by trusting in Christ’s work on the cross sounds too easy for many. But self-effort only leads to disappointment or pride, and then eventually eternal death. I love that Christ’s simple way can be understood by children. His provision is the only way that leads to abundant, eternal life.

Are you connected to Jesus Christ? Have you placed your trust in the One who lacks nothing? I believe this is the greatest decision a person will ever make . . . to accept and follow Jesus Christ, or reject His offer. Eternal life is at stake and the consequences are serious (John 3:15-18, 36).

If you haven’t seen Billy Graham’s second video in My Hope America series, I encourage you to watch the following 30 minute presentation. If you have questions about receiving Jesus Christ as your Savior, or about Christianity, please ask in the comment section and I’ll do my best to answer. :) Have a great week!

Training—Our Goal as Believers

“No pain, no gain!” This familiar motto echoes from many coaches’ lips. As the discipline of training is required to excel in athletics, so we must also discipline ourselves in the Christian life. Such training takes time, vision, dedication, effort, and persistence.

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Training for the Christian Life

The Bible lists three metaphors to describe believers spiritual training:

1. A race (1 Corinthians 9:24-27; Philippians 3:13-14; 2 Timothy 4:7-8)

  • We are told to go into strict training in order to get the prize by focusing all of our energy toward winning the race. Our focal point—Jesus Christ. We can forget the past by confessing our sins to Jesus, our High Priest and advocate (Hebrews 4:14), and repent (turn away from sin, turn toward Christ). Like an athlete pressing toward the finish line, we too can persevere because we know our outcome at the finish line is worth any discomfort: spending eternity with God—sin free, pain free.

2. Exercise (1 Timothy 4:7-10)

  • Repeated exercise tones the body. Repeated spiritual exercise also tones our spiritual muscles, shaping our faith and character. The results? We will live according to God’s will and attract others to Christ. This benefits us now and for eternity.

3. A fight (2 Timothy 4:7-8)

  • That’s right, a fight! We’re called to be soldiers—fighting against real evil forces from without (Ephesians 6:10-18) and temptation from within (1 Corinthians 10:13).

As commitment is needed to succeed in athletics, the same holds true in the Christian arena. As an athlete must learn the rules to compete, believers also must learn God’s rules in His Word (2 Timothy 2:5).

Bible Reading Plans 3765fcc6f0a2d02b1b119d198bd27653

I’ve found Bible reading plans helpful to keep me on track. If you don’t currently have a plan, the following links provide a variety:        Ligonier Ministries
Bible Gateway

I hope you had a wonderful New Year! Let’s train to win this year!

Related Article: Training or Trying?

Greetings 2014!

New beginnings and fresh starts are like . . . . mint on the tongue—refreshing!

A recent study suggested the following 10 New Year resolutions as most common:

  1. Eat healthy and exercise regularlyChristmas lights
  2. Better work/life balance
  3. Learn something new & read more
  4. Quit smoking
  5. Drink less &/or quit
  6. Get organized
  7. Get out of debt & save money
  8. Spend more time with family and friends
  9. Help others
  10. Finish those around the house “to-do” lists

These are noble goals. I’m committing to several. But where is the mention of God?

When I’ve resolved to seek, honor, and follow Him, He has always helped me in the big and small challenges.

Proverbs 28:14 says: Blessed is the [one] who always fears the Lord, but he who hardens his heart falls into trouble.

To fear the Lord means to honor and revere Him.

Jesus, “being in very nature God, did not consider equality with God something to be grasped, but made Himself nothing, taking the very nature of a servant” (Philippians 2:6). He spent His life for us so we might live fully now and for eternity. “[Jesus] humbled Himself and became obedient to death—even death on a cross!” (Vs. 8) Why? Through His sacrifice, He is bringing many people to glory—into His family—through His atoning sacrifice and forgiveness of sins (Hebrews 2:10-18).

We’ve celebrated Jesus’ birth as a baby during Christmas, but Revelation 19:11-16 portrays Jesus returning as the mighty King of Kings and Lord of Lords, “dressed in a robe dipped in blood,” bearing the name: Word of God.

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One day, every knee will bow and tongue confess that Jesus is Lord, (Philippians 2:10-11). Why not do it now, under His favor?

Prayer: Jesus, you are the King of Kings and Lord of Lords. Help us resolve—and desire—to keep you first and center. May we continually seek you, “work[ing] out [our] salvation with fear and trembling” (Philippians 2:12) through daily Bible reading, prayer, and following your lead. You are more than worthy! In you alone, Lord, is an unending reservoir of life, strength, peace, and hope. Give us “the Spirit of wisdom and revelation, so [we] may know you better” (Ephesians1:17). Amen.

Related articles

The Supreme Gift

Why am I in a cleaning out frenzy lately? My husband attributes it to female nesting. Hmm . . . possibly . . . . Or maybe:

  • Anticipation of a new year?
  • Seeing the contrast between my home and Better Homes and Gardens January issue: Simply Organized?
  • Cluttered drawers; forgotten, broken stuff; tripping over my daughter’s toys and boys’ clothes?

Yep . . . all of the above.

Clutter drives me nuts. I feel great after organizing a drawer, but maintenance . . . now that’s an ongoing project! Papers crumple, paint peels, toys break, carpet stains. Eventually, everything material crumbles and fades.

I’m really not trying to downplay giving gifts. I really do love Christmas. Baking, decorating, giving and receiving gifts, watching the kids’ excitement (which begins on Thanksgiving), attending their basketball games and concerts, spending time with family, sending and receiving Christmas cards . . . . It’s all good!

But I have to say, all of the above dims in comparison to knowing Jesus Christ. And I have to ask myself: Is there room in my heart for Christ’s reign, or is it cluttered with other stuff?

A Babe in a Manger

I love that God came down to earth in a poor and lowly place, in the form of a little baby. Jesus–Immanuel–God with us came to bring salvation to everyone, even the poorest and lowliest. As God’s Son, He came to save us from our sins and give us new life. The One who fashioned the universe (Psalm 104:1, 5) also clothed Himself in humanity so we can relate to Him.

Although Christ traveled ancient paths (John 1:1), He’s in the business of restoration and abundant life. Although “the mountains melt like wax before the LORD” (Psalm 97:5), He transforms and renews the surrendered heart (2 Corinthians 5:17). He never fails, breaks down, fades, or changes. His love is bigger than the universe He created.

His Name:

 Jesus Name Tree

(Created by K.D. Manes at tagxedo.com)

What’s on your Christmas list this year? Have you received the supreme gift of Jesus Christ–eternal life, adoption, forgiveness, restoration, healing, love, joy, peace, hope, purpose, friendship, abundant life? (For more on the supremacy of Christ, see Colossians 1:15-20.)

When Jesus was born, there was no room in the inn. Is there room in your heart for Him today?

 Related articles

Share the Gospel in Asia

I believe that the Gospel of Jesus Christ has the power to transform lives, and that EVERYONE, EVERYWHERE, should have the opportunity to hear.

In countries hostile to the Gospel, the government bans radio stations from broadcasting any type of Christian content. They also block websites that produce Christian content, or the Internet in general is just not as accessible.

Christ has called us as the Church, and me individually as a follower, to do something about it.

That’s why I’m fundraising for FEBC (Far East Broadcasting Company), a global missions organization focused on getting the Gospel to these people so that they can hear. They’ve developed a method called the Gospel Chip.

 It’s a MicroSD card that can go into most cell phones, computers, and MP3 players. The Gospel Chip contains audio messages of sermons & Scripture, all in the local language.

Using contacts with underground churches, FEBC can discreetly distribute the Gospel Chip to people without detection. 96% of people in these target countries own a cell phone. This means that almost every person in the country has the means to hear about the love of God through the Gospel Chip.

The amazing part is that it only costs $5 to develop and distribute a chip to someone who hasn’t heard the Gospel.

Stewardship is taken seriously at FEBC. Charity Navigator, EFCA, and BBC are among some of their accrediting agencies. You may view their past audit reports and annual 990 forms at: http://www.febc.org/about-us/financial-accountability.Will you help me raise $250 so that I can send 50 Gospel Chips for 50 people to hear the Gospel? You may safely contribute online at this link: http://donate.febc.org/fundraise?fcid=291542.

Thanks so much for your help!

K.D.

The Christmas Story

My family and I enjoyed visiting the Okanagan Valley and West Kootenay region of B.C. Thanksgiving week. Kootenay Lake, Slocan Lake, and Arrow Lake—nestled between giant mountain peaks—stretch on for miles. The pine blanketed forests and rugged wilderness reminds me of God’s great creativity and power. IMG_2205_1

Holiday Time

The holidays can bring both joy and stress. Amidst busy preparations and seasonal activities, I hope we’ll all find time to relax and delve a little deeper into God’s Christmas treasures.

Last Christmas I bought a short reading guide, The Christmas Story, published by Zondervan in 2010. It highlights Messiah prophecies to the miraculous birth of Jesus. This book also features questions and summaries to help individuals and families better understand corresponding Scripture passages. The following references may be adapted according to your schedule and/or family’s ages.

Christmas Scripture Reading Plan

Old Testament Prophecies and Background of Messiah’s Coming

  1. God’s Promise to David: 2 Samuel 7:1-17
  2. The Sign of Immanuel: Isaiah 7:10-8:10
  3. A Child Is Born: Isaiah 9:1-7
  4. God’s People Ask for Salvation: Psalm 80:1-19
  5. The Branch from Jessie: Isaiah 11:1-10
  6. God Will Come To Save: Isaiah 35:1-10
  7. A Promised Ruler from Bethlehem: Micah 5:1-5

Events Surrounding and Including Jesus’ Birth

  1. The Birth of John Foretold: Luke 1:5-25
  2. An Angel Announces Jesus’ Birth: Luke 1:26-56
  3. Joseph Has a Dream: Matthew 1:18-25
  4. The Birth of John the Baptist: Luke 1:57-80
  5. The Birth of Jesus: Luke 2:1-7
  6. The Shepherds and the Angels: Luke 2:8-20
  7. Mary and Joseph Present Jesus at the Temple: Luke 2:21-40
  8. The Visit of the Magi: Matthew 2:1-12

Jesus: The Son of God and Channel of God’s Loving Forgiveness

  1. Jesus, the Son of God, is Baptized: Matthew 3:13-17
  2. From the Beginning: John 1:1-18
  3. God’s Great Gift of Love: John 3:1-21
  4. Jesus Christ Is Supreme: Colossians 1:15-20
  5. “Let All God’s Angels Worship Him”: Hebrews 1:1-14

May God’s great love and redemption plan seep into our hearts this Christmas . . . . I love the following rendition of Drummer Boy.

Holy Spirit’s Filling—Part 3

If anyone is thirsty, let him come to me and drink. Whoever believes in me, as the Scripture has said, streams of living water will flow from within him.”  – Jesus (John 7:37-38)

Jesus used the term living water in John 4:10 to symbolize eternal life. Living water in 7:38 (above) refers to the Holy Spirit. Wherever the Holy Spirit is accepted, Jesus brings eternal life. (Related post: Thirsty?)

This summary caps my final review of the Spirit’s filling, taken from the following key verse:

Do not get drunk on wine, which leads to debauchery [wickedness]. Instead be filled with the Spirit.”   – Ephesians 5:18

The Apostle Paul contrasts the effects of alcohol here—associated with selfish desires and the old way of life—as a temporary high to being controlled by The Holy Spirit, which results in lasting joy.

Although I’ve sensed the Holy Spirit’s presence and power in church services and in my own life, I haven’t dwelt on the following question until recently.

How Does The Holy Spirit Fill Us?

God’s ways can’t be pinned down to formulas, but He doesn’t leave us clueless either. Tony Evans suggests that Paul’s following remarks in Ephesians 5:19-21 explain the process of the Spirit’s filling:

Speaking to one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody with your heart to the Lord: always giving thanks for all things in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ to God, even the Father; and be subject to one another in the fear of Christ.”

(Paul also urges us to hold our own private worship services, Romans 12:1.)

Practical Application

How does this practically relate to Christians?

  1. Communicate with one another: Christians should regularly reinforce—and be reinforced by others—to keep our focus on Christ and stay on track spiritually (Hebrews 10:24-25)
  2. Communicate with the Lord: Pray . . . . Pray . . . . Pray (John 16:24; 1 Thessalonians 5:18)
  3. Give thanks: for everything in Jesus’ name (Ephesians 5:20; I Thessalonians 5:17)
  4. Be subject to one another: This doesn’t mean the demeaning, subservient thing defined in many circles. But rather, reflecting the servant spirit Jesus beautifully demonstrated.

I don’t know about you, but in comparison to an inflated balloon when filled by the Holy Spirit, I admit—I rapidly deflate at times—spinning wildly before crashing to the ground (especially before my morning cup of coffee, or after too many cups!) 68b9b998e8bfb984213c7a440b36ceedMaybe that’s why we’re told to consistently meet together and encourage one another (Hebrews 10:25). I for one need this!

Results of The Holy Spirit’s Filling

In Christ—when controlled by the Holy Spirit—we have a higher and longer lasting remedy to depression, tension, or boredom. When filled, we benefit from the following results:

  • Christlikeness: (Romans 8:5; Galations 5:22, 23)
  • Help: in daily problems and in our praying (Romans 8:26, 27)
  • Empowerment: to freely serve God and carry out His will (2 Corinthians 3:17; Acts 1:8; Romans 12:6)

The Spirit’s filling brings peace and life (Galations 5:16-23). The quantity and frequency of submitting ourselves to the Spirit’s control directly relates to our spiritual growth. (Related post: Training or Trying)

God loves you! Come to Him right where you are . . . . I was blessed by Steve Rebus’ testimony. Here is a link to his page: http://steverebus.com/about/. Have a fabulous Thanksgiving!

The Holy Spirit’s Filling—Part 2

Is it possible to be a Christian, yet be unwise, unproductive, and asleep spiritually? c20d7b4da71b4a62ab8144883dd5c38dThe Apostle Paul thought so when he penned the following:

This is why it said: “Wake up, O sleeper, rise from the dead, and Christ will shine on you.” Be very careful, then, how you live—not as unwise but as wise, making the most of every opportunity, because the days are evil. Therefore, do not be foolish, but understand what the Lord’s will is.”   Ephesians 5:14-17

What Is The Lord’s Will?

Paul continues: “Do not get drunk on wine, which leads to debauchery [wickedness]. Instead be filled with the Spirit.”  – vs. 18

A synonym for filling is control. Paul is contrasting the negative influence/control of alcohol to the positive influence/control of the Holy Spirit.

Four Observations About The Spirit’s Filling           

(Source: Tony Evans, The Promise)

  1. God’s CommandInterestingly, there is no biblical command to be baptized by the Spirit or indwelt by the Spirit. Those are automatic blessings when we come to Christ through faith. But we are commanded to be filled with the Holy Spirit. This relates to our daily experience of His influence. Our sincerity alone is not enough.
  2. For Every BelieverEphesians 5:18 is plural in the Greek text. Although the Spirit’s filling isn’t automatic, every believer is commanded to submit to the Spirit’s control.
  3. God Does It – This command is passive: We are to “be filled,” not fill ourselves. We are the object of the action—filling of the Holy Spirit. If our soul is full of something other than the Holy Spirit, our life will be very unfulfilling. God has no provision for filling, satisfying, and giving us His power other than the filling of the Holy Spirit.
  4. Keep It UpThis plural, passive command is also in the present tense. In Greek, this means to be a continuous process. Another translation could be rendered: “Keep on being filled with the Spirit.” Why? Sin, people, and circumstances take our attention away from God. But unlike a car emptied of fuel, the depletion of the Spirit’s filling doesn’t mean He has left us (Hebrews 13:5). Rather, depletion of His filling means our loss of experience and enjoyment of His full benefits.

Can you think of a time when you were spiritually asleep, drifting through life? What woke you up?

I’m learning a lot from this study and hope you are too. Next week I will explore the process of being filled and share an inspiring testimony from a brother blogger. So stay tuned!

Be blessed. Be filled . . . Rather, be filled and you will be blessed! :)

If you haven’t watched Billy Graham’s recent message, I encourage you to view it. His consistent, faithful witness is admirable.

The Holy Spirit’s Filling—Part 1

“The Holy Spirit can be in you, and yet you can know very little of His power and influence. The issue we always have to deal with is not how much of the Holy Spirit we have, because we [Christians/believers] all have Him. The issue is how much He has of us . . . . The filling is crucial to experiencing the Spirit’s benefits . . . . The absence of this is spiritual defeat and, ultimately, disaster.”  – Tony Evans

The Bottom Line

It is impossible to live the Christian life on our own (John 15:5).

Christianity—A Supernatural Life

When we were saved, we did not lose our sinful desires. (If you’ve been a Christian for a while, you know this is true.) I used to think: If I just try harder, then I will succeed in my Christian walk. 

XXX

Self-improvement programs don’t work long-term (Romans 7:18-21). The only solution for the “flesh” (sinful desires) is crucifixion with Christ (Galations 2:20). Because the Christian life is a supernatural life, we need supernatural help. This is why God gave us the Holy Spirit—“He who is in you” (1 John 4:4).

Tony Evans writes: “The Spirit’s filling is for every believer . . . . We have to appropriate or claim it because it is not automatic. Every Christian has been baptized into the body of Christ, and every believer is indwelt by the Spirit. But not every Christian is filled with the Spirit. If we were, a command to be filled would not be needed.”

Do not get drunk on wine, which leads to debauchery. Instead, be filled with the Spirit . . . .” – Ephesians 5:18

The Holy Spirit’s Enablement

When filled with the Spirit, He enables us to overcome temptation (1 Corinthians 10:13). He also empowers us to be effective witnesses for Jesus Christ (Acts 1:8).

I love Ephesians 1:18-21: I pray that the eyes of your heart may be enlightened in order that you may know the hope to which He has called you, the riches of his glorious inheritance in his holy people, and his incomparably great power for us who believe. That power is the same as the mighty strength He exerted when He raised Christ from the dead and seated him at his right hand in the heavenly realms, far above all rule and authority, power and dominion, and every name that is invoked, not only in the present age but also in the one to come.

How can a believer know he/she is filled with the Holy Spirit?

Next week—part 2—I will explore the meaning of being filled with the Holy Spirit. Have a great week!

The Holy Spirit—A Purposeful Person

I love the changes fall brings. Farmers’ Markets boast fresh produce. Traces of winter wheat peek their green blades through fertile fields. Bright pumpkins adorn porches. Sweet plum jam, pear cobbler, and wafts of cinnamon spiced cider linger in the kitchen. The extra hour of sleep is also nice. :)

K.D. Manes

(K.D. Manes)

But perhaps fall’s crowning splendor is the glowing foliage. It seems an oxymoron that these color-dyed leaves peak in beauty while simultaneously dying (fading away).

Likewise, when the believer dies by saying “no” to sin and instead follows God’s leading, the Holy Spirit’s beauty is released in that person’s life.

The Holy Spirit—A Unique Person

Like the wind, the Holy Spirit—the third Person of the Trinity—is invisible and intangible. Spirit in the Hebrew and Greek means “wind, breath.” He is the very wind, breath of God who exerts incredible power (Ephesians 3:16-20). But, unlike the wind, He is more than a powerful force just to be used. He is the invisible presence of the perfect loving God—whom we can know and relate to—residing in the believer. (Source: The Promise and Scripture)

The Holy Spirit’s Attributes

  • Intellect: He knows things with His mind (Romans 8:27; 1 Corinthians 2:10-11)
  • Emotions: He can be grieved (Ephesians 4:30); we are not to sin against Him (Matthew 12:31; Acts 5:3)
  • Will: He acts with purpose (1 Corinthians 12:11)

The Holy Spirit’s Primary Goal

The Holy Spirit isn’t here to bring attention to Himself, or to ourselves, but to glorify Christ (John 14:16). He desires to glorify God through our words and actions.

The Holy Spirit’s Method  

One role of the Spirit is to progressively conform the believer into Christ’s character (sanctification) from the inside-out. He’s in the business of disciplining, refining, and removing sin’s impurities. He prepares us for service here and for living eternally with Him. How does He do this? Tony Evans writes: “God will deal with us in a way that cracks open the hard shell of our sin-scarred soul to release our spirits to live under the control of His Holy Spirit.”
Ouch! But it’s for our own good. And, we have access to . . .

The Holy Spirit’s Limitless Reservoir

Trials are exhausting, but we can be encouraged because He is working all things together for the good of those who love Him (Romans 8:28). But if we want the Spirit’s help maneuvering through life’s obstacle courses, we need to prioritize glorifying Christ since this is the Spirit’s main objective. The Spirit’s presence in the believer is ongoing. He is the source of love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control (Galatians 5:23). He is in the business of change—changing our sin hardened hearts into an oasis of abundant life and freedom in Christ. Verses 23b-24 state: “Against such things there is no law. Those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires.”

Since we live by the Spirit, let us keep in step with the Spirit.”  – vs. 25

Is anything holding you back from experiencing the Holy Spirit’s release in your life?

Related articles

The Holy Spirit In the Believer

And I will ask the Father, and He will give you another Counselor to be with you forever—the Spirit of truth. The world cannot accept Him, because it neither sees Him nor knows Him. But you know Him, for He lives with you and will be in you.” – John 14:16-17

Jesus spoke these words the night before his betrayal at the Last Supper. Jesus anticipated returning to His Father in Heaven, but He would not leave His followers helpless and alone. Like Jesus, the Holy Spirit would be with them—giving them comfort, guidance, and strength. But instead of being with them physically as Jesus was, the Holy Spirit would reside in them (See also 1 Corinthians 3:16).

I think this is one of God’s greatest (and mysterious) miracles: giving us new life through the baptism of His Holy Spirit—spiritual birth (John 3:3-8).

When we understand that Christ died in our place for our sins, rose from the grave, and we place our complete trust in Him for salvation—the Holy Spirit comes and indwells the believer. The results of Jesus victory over sin, His sacrifice, and resurrection are huge!

Security in Salvation

Believers can be secure in their salvation. We are sealed by Christ through the Holy Spirit (Ephesians 1:13-14). Jesus, who is stronger than the grips of death, is our Sealer. His seal is the Holy Spirit, “given as a pledge of our inheritance, with a view to the redemption of God’s own possession, to the praise of His glory.”

Believers are chosen [in Christ] before the foundation of the world (Ephesians 1:4-6). Why? Paul says: to create a family of people who are passionate for God’s honor and glory (Ephesians 1:10-12). This is made possible through the Holy Spirit.

God’s children now have direct access to Him because Jesus has made us acceptable in His sight (unlike the Old Testament era when people could only approach God through priests, operating under the old sacrificial system, Hebrews 10:19-23).

Benefits of the Believer’s Security in Christ        (Romans 8)

The Holy Spirit plays an active role in the believer’s life by:

  • Removing chaos and confusion with life and peace
  • Protecting against Satan
  • Assuring no condemnation
  • Uniting us with Christ, (no separation from God)
  • Preserving and protecting what the Father brings into being

Have you been sealed with the Holy Spirit by placing your complete trust in Christ?

Is it possible to grieve the Holy Spirit? How?

How can believers cooperate with the Holy Spirit and glorify God?

The Holy Spirit–Third Person of the Trinity

The truth of the Spirit transcends, but does not contradict reason. The Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit are one and only one God.”  – Herbert Lockyer

My finite mind certainly can’t grasp everything about the Trinity—Father, Son, and Holy Spirit—three distinct Persons, yet one in essence. But the following analogy helps me better understand the Godhead relationship.

WATER

Water (H2O) is a compound composed of three common states: solid, liquid, and gas. According to Wikipedia, water may take many different forms on Earth: water vapor and clouds in the sky, seawater in the oceans, icebergs in the polar oceans, glaciers and rivers in the mountains, and liquid in aquifers in the ground.

Each property of water plays a unique and vital role not only in our lives, but also in our ecosystem. Without water, life would cease to exist.

THE TRINITY

The Bible clearly states there is only one God (Deuteronomy 6:4). The term Trinity signifies the “threefoldness” of the Godhead: Father, Son, and Spirit (Genesis 1:26; 11:7; Matthew 28:19). In reference to these three members, the Greek term homoousious means: “of the same essence or substance [God].” All three are coequal and coeternal.

Of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, Lockyer writes, “Each has some characteristics which the other does not. Neither is God without the others, and each with the others is God . . . . The Father loves the Son—the Son honors the Father—the Spirit testifies of the Son.”

  • God the Father is the original Source of everything (Genesis 1:1).
  • God the Son follows in the order of revelation (John 5:24-27).
  • God the Spirit is the Channel through which the blessings of heaven reach us (Ephesians 2:18). (Source: All the Doctrines of the Bible)

How important is the Holy Spirit’s Work?

I like what Tony Evans says about the centrality of the Holy Spirit:

Without the Holy Spirit, humankind wouldn’t be here. There would be no creation or principle of life. There would be no Virgin birth, or victory over Satan in the wilderness (since the Holy Spirit led Jesus into the wilderness to be tempted). There would be no Bible, no Christians, no one to restrain sin in our world, and no hope of Christ returning.”

Without the Holy Spirit, there would be nothing.

The following music video features the song “How Great Thou Art” sung by nine year-old Rhema Marvanne. Enjoy!

Coming next week: The Holy Spirit’s Uniqueness.

Five Reasons to Study the Holy Spirit

Although I have experienced the Holy Spirit’s goodness, power and witness in my life, I can’t fully grasp and explain everything about Him. Honestly, I’m not sure I’d want a fully explainable and predictable God. There’s adventure, curiosity, and beauty in His mystery, especially when realizing God’s character is steeped in truth and love.  a0a02b4f6a9ba17d5fcfcd6983b11064

I can imagine the character Buzz Lightyear from Toy Story saying of God’s Spirit: “He’s to infinity and BEYOND!”

After all, He is Co-Creator of the world and of people.

As a student who is dependent upon the Holy Spirit’s guidance, I approach this subject carefully and in awe.

Why study the Holy Spirit?

Herbert Lockyer writes, “It is imperative to grasp the truth of the Spirit for many reasons,” [mainly]:

  1. Because it is a neglected doctrinef05477f27e516a79df01596db16d8e6a
  2. Because it is a misunderstood doctrine
  3. Because it is a perverted doctrine
  4. Because it is a Scriptural doctrine
  5. Because it is a practical doctrine

Realizing that God’s Spirit can never be contained, or placed in a neatly labeled box, my next few posts will be a simple summary of the Holy Spirit’s characteristics and ministry from a biblical view. For a more in depth study, I recommend Herbert Lockyer’s excerpt “The Doctrine of the Holy Spirit” from All the Doctrines of the Bible.

Tony Evans book, The Promise, is also enlightening. Tony writes:

To talk about a relationship with the Holy Spirit is at the same time to talk about a relationship with the Father and the Son. Yet, because the Spirit is a distinct Person in the Godhead with a distinct ministry, we also benefit from His unique ministry . . . . The vast resources of the Spirit are for every individual within the church.”

What is your understanding and relationship concerning the Holy Spirit?

Have a wonderful week!

Bible Study–The Holy Spirit’s Role

The Holy Spirit is not merely a nice addendum to the Christian faith. He is at the heart and core of it. He is not merely a force or an influence. He is the third Person of the Trinity, God Himself.”  – Tony Evans, The Promise

One of the Holy Spirit’s role is to illuminate Scripture—guiding believers to understand the meaning of the words that the Spirit Himself already inspired           (2 Peter 1:20-2:1). This ministry of enlightenment is the process by which the Spirit enables believers to grasp and apply God’s truth in daily life.

1 Corinthians 2:10-16 (NIV) states: . . . . These are the things God has revealed to us by his Spirit. The Spirit searches all things, even the deep things of God. For who knows a person’s thoughts except their own spirit within them? In the same way no one knows the thoughts of God except the Spirit of God. What we have received is not the spirit of the world, but the Spirit who is from God, so that we may understand what God has freely given us. This is what we speak, not in words taught us by human wisdom but in words taught by the Spirit, explaining spiritual realities with Spirit-taught words. The person without the Spirit does not accept the things that come from the Spirit of God but considers them foolishness, and cannot understand them because they are discerned only through the Spirit. The person with the Spirit makes judgments about all things, but such a person is not subject to merely human judgments, for, “Who has known the mind of the Lord so as to instruct him?” But we have the mind of Christ.

Abide in Christ

When we abide in Christ, the Holy Spirit translates God’s very thoughts to us!         (1 Corinthians 2:16; 1 John 2:20-27) He acts as a transmitter to and through our human spirit (Proverbs 20:27). Although my mind can’t fully grasp all the workings of the Holy Spirit and the Trinity, I stand amazed by this mysterious truth.

The Holy Spirit Sheds Light 

(Source: touchn2btouched)

(Source: touchn2btouched)

The Holy Spirit, part of the Godhead, knows the deepest thoughts of God. We can trace His role of Illuminator back to Creation—hovering over the earth, dispelling darkness when God said: “Let there be light.”

Our natural minds don’t speak God’s language. Without the illumination of the Holy Spirit, our understanding is muddled. He desires to help us by clarifying spiritual truth.

Results of the Holy Spirit’s Illumination

Clarity, order, peace, faith, and hope dispel confusion, chaos, turmoil, fear, and despair when we communicate with the Holy Spirit.

Recall

Another aspect of the Holy Spirit’s illuminating work is the power of spiritual recall (John 14:26). This usually doesn’t mean remembering word for word passages (at least not in my case), but rather remembrance of a point or paraphrase of Scripture previously read. Countless times the Holy Spirit has counseled me–opening my “spiritual eyes” to His objective truth–helping me in various situations.

Qualifications to Receive Spirit’s Benefits

The promise of the Holy Spirit’s teaching and recall ministry is for all believers. What is Jesus’ condition for receiving the Spirit’s indwelling presence and His benefits?

 Whoever has my commands and keeps them is the one who loves me. The one who loves me will be loved by my Father, and I too will love them and show myself to them.  – John 14:21

Honestly, I struggle sometimes hearing the Holy Spirit speak through His Word. Sometimes He is quiet. But most often, there are  competing signals—busy thoughts, worldly attractions, sin, Satan’s distractions, etc. So I have to ask: How is my spiritual antenna? Does God have my undivided attention? What signals might be jamming up the communication lines with God?

How’s your communication going with God? . . . . More to come: The Holy Spirit.