Paul’s Desire to Visit Rome, Romans 1:8-15

My family’s first boating trip this season gave us opportunity to try out our worn, but workable, canopy. Although it kept us from getting soaked by the onslaught of rain, it also blocked the mountainous scenery, which challenged our joy quota. But an hour later, when we docked for lunch, the grey clouds gave way to blue sky and sunshine. We felt rejuvenated! My kids, along with my husband, whooped and hollered while playing “King of the Dock” before tubing behind the boat.

- K.D. Manes

– K.D. Manes

Although the apostle Paul experienced dire circumstances with water (deadly storms and shipwrecks), Romans 1:8 suggests one source of his refreshment as he opens this section with thanksgiving and prayer for the reader.

I thank my God through Jesus Christ for all of you, because your faith is being reported all over the world.”

What a great thing to be known for. These faith filled believers shined brightly amidst Rome’s darkened society. Although this Roman capital was artistic, literary, and wealthy, it also bore the stains of immorality and idolatry.

Why did Paul thank God through Jesus Christ?

The emphasis in verse 8 is on Christ being the only mediator between God and man (1Timothy 2:5).

  • Love and forgiveness flow from God to us through Christ.
  • Our thanks flow to the Father through Christ.
Paul’s Prayer and Desire to Visit Rome

The bulk of Paul’s prayer is in verses 10-15. He wanted to visit the Roman church to: 1) “impart a spiritual gift”—to mutually encourage and strengthen each other through their faith, and 2) help in the gospel harvest among the Gentiles as he had done elsewhere.

Paul obligated himself to teaching and proclaiming Christ his Savior as salvation to all.

Although Paul had prayed to visit Rome, his attempts were waylaid. When he finally did arrive, it was as a prisoner—slapped, shipwrecked, and bitten by a poisonous snake (Acts 28:16). God did, however, answer his request for a safe arrival.

Has God ever surprised you with His timing and/or answers to prayer?

He may answer our prayers in unexpected ways, but the One who reigns in power and wisdom is in control of our storms.

God is With  Us

Future Glory, Romans 8:18-25

I hope you’ve had a great summer. The glory of summer is soon fading. I enjoy summer, but I really love the changing colors and weather fall brings. I’m thankful for the changing seasons.

Speaking of fading, my computer’s hard-drive died. I’ve told myself that I will never take my computer for granted again! 🙂

Since my hard-drive crashed last week I’ve been using the library’s computer. Unfortunately, I haven’t been able to post pictures. With limited time I will also be posting weekly for a while instead of twice a week.

Seasons

As I write about change and seasons I’m reminded of what my pastor said: “Knowing what season you’re in (spiritually) is important.” He suggested that our lives won’t be in perfect balance as we journey here on earth, but we usually have a rhythm in our spiritual growth. Knowing which season we’re in will determine how we respond.

On the tail of verse 17 in Romans 8, after writing about a season of sharing in Christ’s suffering, Paul sets up three reasons for encouragement: 1) the glory that will be revealed (vs. 18-25); 2) the Holy Spirit’s help (vs. 26-27); and 3) all things work together for good (vs. 28-30).

Hope of God’s Final Victory

I consider that our present sufferings are not worth comparing with the glory that will be revealed in us. The creation waits in eager expectation for the sons of God to be revealed. For the creation was subjected to frustration, not by its own choice, but by the will of the one who subjected it, in hope that the creation itself will be liberated from the bondage to decay and brought into the glorious freedom of the children of God. We know that the whole creation has been groaning as in the pains of childbirth right up to the present time.” –vs. 18-22

Genesis 3:17-19 sets the background for this passage. Paul makes three observations about creation:

  1. It eagerly awaits the revelation of God’s children.
  2. By God’s will, it was subjected to frustration.
  3. It will be set free from decay’s bondage and share in transformation along with God’s children.

Paul ties the believer’s present trials to creation in verses 23-25. Similar to creation, we groan inwardly as we await the full adoption as God’s children that will happen at the resurrection. Our present hope is “the first-fruits of the Spirit”, God’s promise of our total victory with Christ in the end.

So What?

Through sin, all creation is subject to frustration and bondage to decay. But one day all creation will be set free and transformed. Because believers look forward to a new heaven and earth that God promised we can be filled with hope now.

Believers resurrected bodies will be glorified like the body Christ now has in heaven (1 Corinthians 15:25-58; 1 John 3:2). Believers have the down payment, “first-fruits”, of the Holy Spirit as a guarantee of being resurrected (2 Corinthians 1:22; 5:5; Eph. 1:14).

If you are a believer who is currently suffering, hold on to hope. Ultimate victory is your final resting place through Jesus Christ!