God’s Revelation, Romans 1:18-32

“Guilty as charged!” The judge’s gavel slams down with thundering finality.

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Like a seasoned attorney in a court room, Paul threads God’s general revelation through nature as a convincing argument for the revelation of God’s wrath in His judgment on the Gentiles who rebel against Him. In the following verses, Paul tackles a common objection: How could a loving God send anyone to hell?

The wrath of God is being revealed from heaven against all the godlessness and wickedness of men who suppress the truth by their wickedness, since what may be known about God is plain to them, because God has made it plain to them. Since the creation of the world God’s invisible qualities—His eternal power and divine nature—have been clearly seen, being understood from what has been made, so that men are without excuse.” – vs. 18-20(NIV)

God’s revelation of Himself through nature gives the simplest grounds of our responsibility toward Him. Through His creation, (although marred by sins’ effects, Gen. 3:17-19), we know God is powerful, intelligent, creative, and a God of order and beauty.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERADoes anyone have an excuse for not acknowledging God?

Although no one will be excused for not believing in God, some will choose not to acknowledge Him or give Him thanks.

Sins’ Downward Cycle

Paul comments about God’s wrath in verse 18 from Romans 1:19-3:20. The downward cycle of sin can be summarized as the following:

  • Rejection of God—arrogance and rebellion; self is placed on the throne
  • Idolatry—One makes up ideas of what a god should be and do; exchanging the truth for a lie to fit one’s lifestyle
  • Fall into sin—sexual sin, greed, hatred, envy, murder, strife, deceit, malice, gossip are a few mentioned here
  • Hatred toward God—encouraging others to join them
God’s Nature

Although God is patient and long-suffering—desiring to restore the sinner— He will not put up with sin forever. His very nature is holiness.

The Verdict?

God’s judgment of sin and impurity begins by allowing the consequences of people’s sinful choices. Verse 21 speaks of those who refuse to glorify and thank God: “their thinking became futile and their foolish hearts darkened”. Verse 24 speaks of God giving them over to their sinful desires, indicating sexual impurity. Finally, Paul lists 21 indictments (negative qualities) against those who abandon themselves to their sinful natures (vs. 29-32).

Following God and choosing faith in Him may be hard, but is choosing not to follow Him easier?

Resisting God may seem easy at first, but this path eventually leads to the worst kind of slavery: slavery to sin.

Why did Jesus die?

Thank you to everyone who participated in my poll two weeks ago. The tallies are in . . . Drum roll . . . The winner? It’s a tie. Looks like all four categories will share the platform:

  • Bible Study . . . . 25%
  • Original pictures . . . . 25%
  • “Surprise me” . . . . 25%
  • Other: Evangelism . . . . 25%

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I thought on this Good Friday, Jesus’ own words about His death, burial, and resurrection pave the perfect way for studying evangelism, which will be my topic for the next few weeks.

 Jesus Explains Why He Must Die: John 12:23-33 (NIV)

The hour has come for the Son of Man to be glorified. I tell you the truth, unless a kernel of wheat falls to the ground and dies, it remains only a single seed. But if it dies, it produces many seeds. The man who loves his life will lose it, while the man who hates his life in this world will keep it for eternal life. Whoever serves me must follow me; and where I am, my servant also will be. My Father will honor the one who serves me . . . . Now my heart is troubled, and what shall I say? ‘Father, save me from this hour?’ No, it was for this very reason I came to this hour. Father, glorify your name! . . . . (vs. 32-33) But I, when I am lifted up from the earth, will draw all men to myself.”

Living in an area surrounded by beautiful rolling hills of wheat, I appreciate and relate to Jesus’ word picture.

Living in an area surrounded by beautiful rolling hills of wheat, I appreciate and relate to Jesus’ word picture.

Unless a kernel of wheat is buried, it will not take root and become a blade of wheat producing many more seeds. Seeds generally store energy. When the seed is planted, the bit of energy within is sacrificed in order to establish the new plant.

Similarly, Jesus’ ultimate sacrifice was dying in our place. 2 Corinthians 5:21 says, For He (God) made Him (Jesus) who knew no sin to be sin for us, that we might become the righteousness of God in Him.

We celebrate Jesus’ resurrection and victory over death at Easter. Because He is the sinless Son of God who paid our sins’ death penalty, He alone offers forgiveness and eternal life to all who believe in Him.

In response to His sacrifice, Jesus calls us to follow Him by crucifying our sin and self-centeredness. God is raising a crop of righteousness. Jesus sets the perfect example of service in John 13 as He washes His disciples’ feet—a job that was reserved for the lowliest slave. Although it sounds like an oxymoron, the hard work of transferring control of our lives to Christ by serving God is worth all effort and discomfort. When we embrace Christ and His ways we receive eternal life, genuine peace, lasting joy, and showcase Christ to others.

Is there anything in your life that needs to die in order to experience the fruit of God’s joy and peace?

Benefits of Suffering

Shannon Moreno’s post, Benefits of Suffering, really ties into the theme of Faith Writers’ book, Trials and Triumphs. Shannon has also written a great inspirational book called: Finding the Light (Prayerful Poetry). You can find it here: http://revelationsinwriting.wordpress.com

But before you read Shannon’s post, a little business is in order: CONGRATULATIONS . . . .
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You’re the WINNER of:

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Revelations In Writing

Trials and troubles touch the lives of everyone, eventually. Often, when the struggles squeeze, people begin to wonder why. Though I know not all the answers, I appreciate the footnotes found for 2 Corinthians 4:17  that speak of the following benefits of our suffering: (1) They remind us of Christ’s suffering for us; (2) they keep us from pride; (3) they cause us to look beyond this brief life; (4) they prove our faith to others; and (5) they give God the opportunity to demonstrate His power.

“For our light and momentary troubles are achieving for us an eternal glory that far outweighs them all. So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen. For what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal.” – (2 Corinthians 4:17-18)

Not only should we recognize the opportunities presented in our suffering, but also…

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Trials and Triumphs book give-away

Yes, I promised last week I would give away Faith Writers Trials and Triumphs to a lucky winner.Trials_&_Triumphs_Final_Cover For those of you who would like more information on this book, click on Amazon’s link: Trials and Triumphs. I am privileged to have my testimony included in this anthology along with 39 other writers. Although we are a diverse group, we share a unifying saving grace in the person of Jesus Christ.

But first, will you please fill out my poll? Don’t forget to click “vote”. I greatly appreciate your feedback! (Don’t worry, your name won’t appear when you vote, only percentages.)

Blessings,

K.D.

 

 

 

 

 

Seven Primary Spiritual Gifts

We have different gifts, according to the grace given us. If a man’s gift is prophesying, let him use it in proportion to his faith. If it is serving, let him serve; if it is teaching, let him teach; if it is encouraging, let him encourage; if it is contributing to the needs of others, let him give generously; if it is leadership, let him govern diligently; if it is showing mercy, let him do it cheerfully.”          Romans 12:6-8 (NIV)

Every believer has one primary motivational gift

According to the above passage, the seven motivational gifts are:

  1. Prophecy – Communication of revealed truth that builds up believers
  2. Service – Practical service to help others
  3. Teaching – To provide guidance and moral instruction
  4. Encouragement – Encouraging, comforting, and exhorting others
  5. Giving – Cheerfully contributing to the needs of others
  6. Leadership – Service carried out for the benefit of others
  7. Mercy – Helpful activities such as feeding the hungry, caring of the sick and aging

Not only does the Bible command the church to lovingly exercise all seven of these motivational gifts, but every believer also needs these seven areas in order to grow as God desires.

Do you know your primary motivational gift? It’s our job to discover what that gift is. Spiritual gift inventories may be helpful, but I’ve found the best way is to jump in and try an area of service that seems fitting, (see God’s Masterpiece & Sublime Design).

Taking a class at church and/or talking to someone who knows you well will also help you discover your primary gift. I really like how our church encourages and gives people permission to volunteer for 90 days in an area of service. By the end of three months, the individual has a pretty good idea if he/she has that particular gift. If it’s not a good fit, we’re encouraged to try another area of ministry.

We are most effective for Christ when we lovingly use the gift(s) He has given us, (see 1 Corinthians 13). But this shouldn’t be an excuse for not occasionally taking out the trash, or lending a helping hand for someone whose primary gift isn’t service.

I love that God shapes us uniquely. Our gifts will look differently in the way they are expressed through a variety of ministry. When we exercise our gifts through ministry, the Holy Spirit is the One who determines what impact another believer will receive (1 Corinthians 12:8-11).

How do you know what your primary gift is?

Joy and fruitfulness are often the results when exercising your primary gift.