Righteousness Through Christ, Romans 3:21-31

If you feel buried with the depressing news of God’s condemnation of our sin, hold on! 8eac46465563cf7c764bde3ab6662c60

Paul brings us great news: We can be declared not guilty—justified—by trusting Jesus Christ to remove our sins.

Paul’s meeting with the risen Christ on the Damascus road radically changed his dependence on the Law and his stance that he was righteous by following the Law (Phil. 3:6). In this passage, he writes of the righteousness found through Jesus Christ.

Attested by the Law and the Prophets

In verse 21 Paul expands on Rom. 1:2 to include the Law with the prophets in bearing witness to God’s saving acts in Jesus Christ. Interestingly, the Old Testament promises are fulfilled in the New Testament.

Experienced through Faith in Jesus Christ (vs. 22-25)

Paul reminds us of our verdict: “for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God” (vs. 23).

But he doesn’t leave us stranded in God’s just death penalty toward us due to our sins. Instead, Paul affirms that God made available a right relationship with Him by trusting His Son, Jesus Christ.

Sweet Grace

Grace: The free favor of God in salvation. Unmerited, unearned “kindness and love of God our Savior toward us” (Titus 3:4).

I thought my cousin’s picture depicts a great response to God’s grace.

Photo credit: Kendall Smitherman

Photo credit: Kendall Smitherman

Paul’s uses three metaphors to illustrate what God has done for sinners through His Son, Jesus Christ (vs. 24-25):

  1. Courtroom: In this setting, we see a condemned person who hears his/her charges have been completely cleared.
  2. Slaves: In Old Testament times, a person’s debts could result in his being sold as a slave. The next of kin could buy his freedom (redemption) and set him free from bondage. Jesus paid the price of our sin, death, so we can go free.
  3. Ritual Sacrifice: The wrath of God has been removed from the guilty person.
God’s Justice

In verses 25-26, Paul shows that God forgave all human sin at the cross, even those who lived before Christ came. Paul argued that God’s timing doesn’t mean He is indifferent to sin and justice, but rather: 1) He is just, and 2) He is the One who justifies—makes right with Himself—those who trust in Him.

The following points sum up this section:

  • Excludes Pride (vs. 27-28): When God’s grace is understood, pride vanishes. Why? Faith isn’t a deed we perform, rather, it exalts what God has done. Faith is based on our relationship with God, not on trying to attain right standing with God by keeping the Law.
  • Affirms God As God of All (vs. 29-30): Paul affirms that God is the God of both Jews and Gentiles.
  • Upholds the Law (vs. 30): Does faith “nullify” (abolish) the Law? As in the opening of chapter 3, Paul answers “Absolutely not!” Faith in Christ fulfills all the obligations of the Law. The NIV study Bible says, “When we understand the way of salvation through faith, we understand the Jewish religion better . . . . Faith does not wipe out the Old Testament. Rather, it makes God’s dealings with the Jewish people understandable.”
So What?  

When God confronts us with the gospel of Christ, we are invited to receive a righteousness and right standing before Him apart from following any legalistic religious code. What God has done through the death of His Son on the cross—providing payment for our death penalty—may be experienced by us through faith.

Why does God desire a relationship with us based on faith in His Son?

What are some results of justification by faith (God’s act of declaring us not guilty for our sins)?

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