Strike Three: Gnats, Exodus 8:16-19

From the way Denny’s shaking his head, he’s either got an injured shoulder or a gnat in his eye. ”  – Jerry Coleman

Source: clipartpanda.com

Source: clipartpanda.com

After God strikes Pharaoh and Egypt with the plague of blood, then frogs—due to their oppression of the Israelites—God sends a plague of gnats. You may read Exodus 8:16-19 here: Bible Gateway.

I didn’t have much success in finding many gnat quotes, (as you can see in my opener), but here are some interesting—or should I say disgusting—facts about these tiny creatures (Source: I Remove Pest).

  • Gnats use fermenting or decaying substance as a medium to breed.
  • Gnats feed themselves and live on rotten or decay substances.
  • Biting female gnats require and use blood as an effective protein for reproduction. Sometimes they will travel more than 40 miles for blood to breed.
  • Female gnats lay up to 300 eggs a day.
  • A larvae will turn into an adult gnat in a week.

As with the last two plagues, the following is my short fictional narrative of this Exodus passage.

***

Pharaoh swat at the swarm of gnats as though he were in the heat of battle. It was only a short while ago that he had defeated the accursed Hatti and his band of Hittites with a mighty hail fire of arrows and javelins. But his strength and glory amounted to nothing with these tiny pests, as was also the case during the plague of blood, then frogs.

This plague—pronounced by Moses from His God—erupt from the desert dust like a huge storm cloud covering his land, people, and animals. No one could keep the tiny bugs from wedging themselves under their linen clothing. The multiple bites not only stung, but also left itchy red bumps all over its victims.

Could Moses’ God, whom he referred to as Lord, really have this much power over nature?

As Pharaoh’s arms swell with blotchy red bumps, he rip his bracelets from his wrists before flinging them at the rigid magi standing before him. None of them dare flinch to attract his steel gaze. For in an instant he could untether the chain of the lion sitting at the foot of his golden throne. Fortunately for them, both the lion and Pharaoh were distracted with the biting insects.

“Why can’t you also produce gnats?” he yelled at his magi while trying to spit the bugs from his mouth.

A moment of silence only aggravated Pharaoh more, sending him into a tantrum of wild gestures. The lead magi finally spoke in a hush tone. “Surely this is the finger of God. For we can neither do nor undo this gnat infestation.”

“Nonsense!” Pharaoh hurl a quiver in their direction. A shriek filled the room as one of the magicians stumble backwards and collapse to the floor.

“Leave, you fools!”

A couple of magi rushed to grab their injured colleague before scrambling out of the throne room.

Reflect

Once again—just as God had said—Pharaoh refused to listen and hardened his heart.

Persistence is a good thing. But self-centered stubbornness, as in Pharaoh’s case, can be downright destructive.

The Life Application Study Bible summarizes: “[Pharaoh’s] stubborn disobedience brought suffering upon himself and his entire country. . . Stubbornness toward God is always disobedience. Avoid disobedience because the consequences may spill onto others.”

Thanks for taking the time to read. Have a wonderful week!

 

8 thoughts on “Strike Three: Gnats, Exodus 8:16-19

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s