Ready to Revere

The idea of fearing God is not a popular concept in the American church. So much so that many church leaders have watered down God’s truth, trying to make it appear less daunting and more appealing to the masses. But the Hebrew word for fear means: Be afraid . . . anxiety caused by approaching danger.

When we recognize this truth, we realize there is a power that is greater than us and can overcome us in an instant. This should check our hearts and make us tremble, at least for a moment. And yet, this powerful, loving God wants to have a relationship with each of us. How much does He long to save us from death, the consequence of our sin, and give us abundant life instead? To the point that He sacrificed His only Son, Jesus Christ, for everyone who would accept His free gift of forgiveness and salvation when He died on the cross.

In the Hebrew context, fear isn’t an emotion word, but rather an action verb where recognition of something (God’s power, majesty, holiness, forgiveness, goodness, judgment) causes specific action. Fear isn’t meant to stay in our hearts, but rather worked out in reverence toward God through a manifestation of worship. Godly fear is the beginning of wisdom (Prov. 1:7). Other action words defining godly fear include: Hating evil (Prov. 8:13), satisfying (Prov. 14:27), and sanctifying (Ps. 19: 9).

Continuing in the book of Malachi, Pastor Cliff Purcell shares a heartfelt message. Warning: This is not an easy passage to digest, especially for pastors, which this portion is directed toward. But this section also contains truth for all of us who are Christ followers. You may listen to his podcast here: Ready to Revere (Oct. 7, 2018).

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